Overcoming Racism: The Pursuit of Reconciliation

Like most others, I am saddened by the violent loss of human life. Whether it is the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile or the deaths of the five police officers, Lorne Ahrens, Michael Krol, Michael Smith, Brent Thompson, and Patrick Zamarripa, there are now seven different families that are grieving the loss of someone they loved. As a follower of Jesus and a minister of the gospel, I am grieved because I don’t like seeing and hearing of others suffering. I am also  frustrated because I believe the church of Jesus Christ in America should be an example of reconciliation but isn’t. But as a Christian, as a follower of Jesus, I believe we must!

On television and social-media, the vitriol and anger is so palpable that it can be cut with a knife. Some want to point fingers, but don’t! Blaming others for flaming the current racial divide only stokes the fire more. The truth is that racism and inequality has always been a problem in America but those who have suffered as a result of such hatred, particularly blacks, are tired and are crying out to those of us with ears to hear and eyes to see. Some seem to think that violence will help but it won’t. It never has and never will. In fact, violence only begets violence which only begets more anger and hatred which only begets more violence which only… you get my point.

But there is an alternative to blaming others and killing one another, an alternative that seeks true peace and reconciliation. As a praxis, peace and reconciliation begin with a conversation that’s possible because Jesus has died on the cross, exposing the darkness and rendering it powerless (cf. Col 2:15). On the cross, Jesus extends true love and forgiveness. In turn, we are free to love each other with enough humility to hear the pain of the other, repent as necessary (whether it’s injustice or just indifference and apathy), forgive each other, learn to speak truthfully with each other and serve with each other for the sake of justice.

What we need is a conversation where we come around the table with enough humility to listen with empathy to others, especially to people of different skin colors. Overcoming racial and social differences requires that we engage others, listening with empathy for the struggles of the other. Love demands that we engage others, listening with empathy to their struggles of being hated and discriminated against. The pursuit of reconciliation demands that we are willing to repent where necessary, forgive one another, and stand with the oppressed in their desire for justice.

The place for such conversations should be our churches and that means becoming intentional about creating and cultivating space for such conversations. Our pursuit of reconciliation is the outworking of the gospel we profess and our currency that gives visible substance to our gospel, so that our proclamation of the gospel is a living tradition rather than dead traditionalism. But for far too long churches have been on the wrong side of the fence either because we were engaged in unjust practices of racism or because our we remained indifferent, pursuing other issues we deemed more important. This has to change! If we believe that it is the gospel of Jesus Christ and not Democrat or Republican politics that offers true peace and reconciliation then it must change and that change must be us. So let’s open space for others of different color at the table, just as Jesus has done for us, that we may pursue reconciliation with them.

The Gospel According To Us

“Preach the gospel at all times. When necessary use words.” This famous quote is often attributed to the twelfth century Catholic Friar, St. Francis of Assisi, though as far as we know he never actually made such a statement. Christians often share this quote as a reminder that the life of Christians should be a proclamation of the gospel itself and that the gospel proclaimed in spoken word is insufficient. Of course, this quote attributed to St. Francis has also come under criticism in an attempt preserve the necessity of preaching the gospel in words. Ed Stetzer goes so far as to say that “the quote is not biblical.”

Is it really unbiblical to suggest that we should preach the gospel and only use words as necessary? Stetzer thinks so and makes his case by appealing to the Apostle Paul, particularly what Paul says in 1 Corinthians 15:1-8:

The Apostle Paul summarized the gospel as the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ… The gospel is not habit, but history. The gospel is the declaration of something that actually happened. And since the gospel is the saving work of Jesus, it isn’t something we can do, but it is something we must announce. We do live out its implications, but if we are to make the gospel known, we will do so through words.

The problem with this is that while it’s fair to describe what Paul says in 1 Corinthians 15 about the gospel as a summary, we must remember that it’s just a summary. As with any summary, there is much more detail to what the gospel of Jesus Christ is and that is found in the larger biblical narrative which is why Paul says that the death of Christ is “according to the Scriptures” (v. 4). Beyond the mere facts of Jesus’ death, burial, and resurrection, there is a kingdom with a particular end (telos) that cannot be separated from the gospel. Even more so, behind the historical facts of the gospel is the actually life which Jesus lived and called us to follow him in living too. We read of this life in the four canonical Gospels, the Gospel According to Mathew, Mark, Luke, and John. As Scot McKnight points out, these four books are called “Gospels” because they each are witnesses to the storied life that Jesus lived (The King Jesus Gospel, pp. 81-82). That’s important because Jesus himself proclaimed the gospel in both word and deed. Put another way, Jesus both demonstrated and declared the gospel, the good news of the kingdom of God.

Unequivocally then, the gospel is preached in both word and deed, and therefore something which is both seen and heard. So rather than making a dichotomy between preaching the gospel in word and deed, turning this into an either/or issue, let’s treat preaching the gospel in word and deed as a both/and issue. If someone thinks the gospel only needs to be lived and never proclaimed in word, then Ed Stetzer has a valid reason for concern and I join with him in voicing such concern. However, I suspect that some Christians regard the gospel demonstrated as less important that the gospel declared. I don’t know of a Christian who would admit such devaluing of the demonstrated gospel but when we look at what is done, there are reasons for such suspicions.

“Jesus both demonstrated and declared the gospel, the good news of the kingdom of God.”

Last week after various evangelical leaders met with Presidential Candidate Donald Trump, James Dobson of Focus on the Family declared that Trump had accepted Jesus Christ and therefore was now a Christian. Regardless of Trump’s political views, there is good reason for raising questions about Trump’s alleged conversion when months ago Trump said that he has never even asked God for forgiveness and did not have any need of repentance. However, as one article recently said, this is not about Trump:

But I think these things are less the failure of Trump’s Christian infancy as much as they are a microcosm of the underlying problem with much of America’s evangelical movement — we actually have no idea what it means to be Christian. We lack a meaningful understanding of faith and belief.

That’s right, the issue is really a problem for Christians.

However, I believe such confusion about what it means to be a Christian flows from a misunderstanding of the gospel itself. If we think that demonstrating the gospel is somehow less important than declaring the gospel with the spoken word then it’s easy to define a Christian based on what they say, such as claiming to have accepted Jesus Christ. Identifying a Christian has less or even little to do with the transformed living that comes from the Spirit at work as we repent and receive our baptism into Christ.

While we all, as Christians, including myself, struggle in someway to live congruently with the faith we profess, our faith in Jesus is intended to become an embodied life as much as it is a confession. Yet one only needs to open up the status feed on social-media to see that what Christians often believe in, value, and advocate for is far removed from Jesus… Like when a woman’s right to choice or a person’s right to bear arms eclipses all consideration of the thousands of unborn children or the numerous civilians who are being slaughtered by gun violence across America… Like when fear of terrorism, Muslim refugees, and undocumented immigrants justifies an expedient exemption from love our neighbors as ourselves and even loving our enemies… Like when the need to either be politically correct or politically offensive allows the demonization of either the police or the #BlackLivesMatter movement, depending on what side one falls on, or despise the LBGTQ community…. Like when sounds more like an echo chamber of Bill Maher or Bill O’Reilly than Jesus and the Bible that bears witness to Jesus. And like I said, one only needs to turn to social-media to see what I’m getting at.

“…our faith in Jesus is intended to become an embodied life as much as it is a confession.”

The only way forward begins with a better understanding of the gospel, which includes understanding the gospel as an embodied way of life rooted in the mission of God. I’ve just finished reading Michael J. Gorman’s book Becoming The Gospel which summarizes this saying:

From Paul’s perspective the gospel itself is a powerful word of transformation, its content being given voice not merely in words but also, and inseparably, in actions. This does not eliminate the need for, or the importance of, words, but it does imply that the words have meaning and power only in action. God did something in Christ; Christ did something in becoming human and giving himself for us; the Spirit does something to and through the people who believe the good news of this divine activity.

     Furthermore, the content of the gospel Paul preaches is so thoroughly rooted both in the peculiar Christological shape of this divine activity — the life and teaching, and especially the death and resurrection, of Jesus — and in the Scriptures of Israel, with their promises of the Spirit and of shalom, that people who believe such good news are ineluctably drawn into its strange Christ-shaped and Scripture-shaped reality. So if the gospel has to do with a faithful God, a Suffering Servant who inaugurates God’s shalom, and a prophetically promised indwelling Spirit, then the individuals and communities who believe in that good news will be shaped in their minds and bodies, their thinking and their living, into Godlike, Christlike, Spirit-enabled people who in some real, if imperfect, way instantiate the message they believe (p. 298).

This connection between the gospel as historical reality and embodied life is what seems lacking, in varying degrees, among many Christians and local churches.

I’ve talked with more than a few churches over my years as a minister. Most are experiencing some decline and seeking renewal, desiring both spiritual and numerical growth. That’s good but we must understand that renewal is the work of God which sprouts from the gospel as it is believed in word and embodied in deed. So I would like to suggest that we must give as much, if not more, attention to demonstrating the gospel in the way we live as we give to declaring the gospel with words — without drawing a sharp distinction between word and deed since what we believe, value, and advocate for with spoken words reflects and impacts how we live.

How we demonstrate the gospel matters more than ever if we are to have any credible gospel witness. In fact, in our post-Christendom society where our Christian voice is increasingly marginalized, how we demonstrate the gospel becomes a currency of sorts for gaining a hearing. Without demonstrating the gospel, we lose the audience of those who may be open to the declared gospel. Stated in the positive, demonstrating the gospel as our embodied way of life gives us the credibility for declaring the gospel and “preaching the word” then becomes an explanation of what is seen rather than just an argumentation for what we profess. After all, the only gospel of Jesus Christ others are going to see and hear is, as the picture above suggest, the gospel according to us… the gospel we embody in word and deed. So to invoke the alleged wisdom of St. Francis of Assisi again, “Preach the gospel at all times. When necessary use words.”

Visions, Churches, and Conversion

When it comes to the book of Acts, a lot of attention has been given to the so-called conversion stories. There are good reasons for this, as these conversion stories not only give us an account of the gospel being preached to unbelievers but also how people responded to the gospel message. One of those conversion stories tells of the first Gentile conversion to Christ when a centurion soldier named Cornelius and his household were baptized. But there’s another “conversion story” (if you will) within this story that seems overlooked, the conversion of the Apostle Peter told in Acts 10:9-23.

Conversion might seem an odd way of describing what happens to Peter on the roof but conversion is repentance, a change involving a person’s entire self to the will of God. What happens to Peter is a conversion towards the impartiality of God (Witherup, Conversion In The New Testament, 69) and it demands our attention, especially if we’re interested being led by the Spirit as I have heard different churches express.

When Heaven Opens…

When Peter went up on to the roof to pray, he was a God-fearing follower of Jesus. His devotion to God as a follower of Jesus has already led to him proclaiming Jesus as the crucified and resurrected Lord and Messiah (Acts 2:36) and it has resulted in even being arrested (Acts 4:3). So there isn’t any question about the sincerity of Peter’s faith. Peter is a God-fearing follower of Jesus but he’s still lacks some understanding he will need to repent of in order to believe in the full gospel and live fully as a participant in the mission of God.

The repentance Peter is in need of has to do with what he regards as unclean. In a dream of sorts, Peter receives a vision of all different kinds of four-footed animals telling him, “Get up, Peter. Kill and eat.” Peter’s response is an immediate and emphatic rejection of such a suggestion. And who can blame Peter. Like Jesus and the other apostles, Peter knew the scriptures  and he knew that the Law clearly forbids eating anything unclean (Lev 11:47). But the voice in the dream tells him to stop calling unclean what God has made clean (Acts 10:13) and Peter will later say that this voice was God teaching him that he should not speak of anyone or anything as unclean (Acts 10:28). Consequently, despite his conviction about what he thought was the biblical teaching regarding clean and unclean, Peter had to recognize that he was wrong in his belief on this issue and repent.

Is there a lesson for churches today? I believe so. The churches I am familiar with have a very high view of scripture and are devout God-fearing followers of Jesus. Like Peter, we know that we must “obey God rather than human beings” (Acts 5:29). But like Peter, could we ever be wrong about what we believe is God’s will according to scripture? I certainly hope so because it takes an abundance of hubris to think otherwise. Although everyone of us believes we are right in the different views we hold, we must open ourselves to the possibility that God may be trying to show us we are in fact wrong. That requires humility, which most of the churches I encounter seem to possess. This openness is important because without it, we risk the danger of one day become so dogmatic and self-righteous that we end up looking more like the religious authorities who opposed Jesus and the apostles.

Letting Go…

The conversion of Peter in this story is not a result of a different Bible teaching, a point that should not go unnoticed. It is a vision that initially challenges Peter’s understanding of scripture which has taught him to reject what is unclean and that is only the beginning point. So how is it that Peter will regard what he has previously believed, with good biblical reasoning, and open himself new understanding of God’s will? While Peter is aided by the voice of the Spirit, it is the unfolding events that help him make sense of the vision and conclude that the vision is the revealing of God’s will. In fact, he unfolding events to come will stretch Peter’s understanding of what it means to be a member of the people of God (Johnson, The Acts of the Apostles, 187).

The openness of Peter is a mindset that churches must embrace if they are to participate in the mission of God. It is an openness that’s willing to say that the way we have understood scripture on any particular issue is wrong and requires us to change (repentance). But it is also requires a willingness to relinquish control and I’m talking about the control that keeps everything safe, comfortable and within our “dogma” box. Of course, we can become dogmatic and double-down with our biblical proof-texts, insisting that the scripture says… But imagine if Peter would have taken that approach. Sometimes our understanding of scripture is wrong and if we’re open to seeing how God is at work in the unfolding events rather than defining how God must work with our predetermined conclusions about the teaching of scripture, we might see our need for conversion as did Peter.

Peter doesn’t turn to scripture but allows his experience in the events that unfold to redefine for him the boundaries of God’s people and in whom God is at work. I’m not suggesting that scripture is without authority or has a diminished importance but we must learn to discern what God might be saying though events, experiences, and voices other than scripture. For example, I grew up believing that only those who understood scripture exactly as I did were true Christians but this sort of sectarianism began to crumble when I began to take notice of the Spirit dwelling among other believers in Jesus, evidenced by the fruit of the Spirit in their lives. I realized that God is not partial in offering his grace to only those who think they understand all the teachings of scripture correctly. The same might also apply to the way we view women serving in ministry. Regardless of what we think certain passages teach regarding women serving in ministry, when we see how God has gifted some women as incredible teachers and leaders might it suggest that maybe our understanding of certain biblical passages is wrong?

A Final Thought…

Peter underwent a conversion because he was open enough to know he could be wrong and needed to reconsider what he believed about what God is up to. We know the results, the gospel expanded to the Gentiles and Christianity began to differentiate itself as an entirely new movement rather than just another Jewish sect. Right now any local churches find themselves at a pivotal point, facing decline and wondering where God is leading them next. The real question is whether or not we are open enough to be surprised as to where God is leading or will we simply insist on not eating anything unclean?

Hope Remains!

Aunt PatThis past Wednesday my Aunt Pat, who is pictured on the left, took her last breath in this life. Having battled cancer for the last couple years of her life, her suffering finally came to an end. That is another way of saying that although my aunt will be very missed, her death is a relief in some manner as she is no longer having to endure the pain and suffering that usually comes with the final stage of cancer.

I don’t want to be misunderstood about death. Death is a terrible thing. Whether it comes at the end of a very long and beautiful life or it comes prematurely through tragic circumstances such as violence, disease, etc… death is still something that should grieve us. Death has grieved me and still does, from the day when I was twenty-two years old and watched my dad, who had cancer too, take his last breath, to the day when my first son, Kenny, unexpectedly died and a year after that when my younger brother tragically died. Death stings and hurts because once someone we love is gone, they’re gone.

Death also grieves God who created life to flourish rather than perish. So when we turn on the news and hear of people who were violently killed in an Orlando nightclub, or in some school like Sandy Hook Elementary, or at a movie theatre in Auroa, or even in foreign countries like the Westgate Mall shooting in Nairobi Kenya, God is grieved. It matters not what the victims religious beliefs were or what sort of moral lifestyle they lived, these are people created in the image of God and loved by God.

In this world of death which is also filled with much hatred and violence, it is tempting to become cynical. It’s tempting to throw our hands in the air as though life is hopeless. But I refuse such cynicism because I believe that God has become a human like us in the person of Jesus Christ and that in the coming of Jesus, God is reconciling all things through Jesus who was crucified and raised victoriously from death (Col 2:19-20). I believe there is a day coming when Jesus will come again and make all things new, a day when the new heaven and new earth will be one and death will be no more (Rev 21:1, 4-5).

So even as death seems all around us, hope remains! Until the day when Jesus returns or the day when I take my last breath, which I hope is not any time soon, and I rest in Christ while awaiting his return, I will live with faith(fullness), love, and hope (1 Thess 5:8). Let’s seek peace with each other, loving our neighbors and even our enemies, forgiving others as God forgives us, grieving with those who are grieving, and let the Spirit of God sanctify us that we may live with faith, love, and hope.


Here is a video of the choral group singing the hymn Be Still, My Soul, which I listen too frequently. I first heard this hymn when I was struggling to make sense of life and maintain my faith after the death of my son and younger brother. This hymn speaks gives voice to the grief and pain of suffering as well as the hope that encourages faith.

Christians… What’s Next?

It was during the mid-afternoon this past Sunday when I heard the horrific news of yet another mass-shooting taking place in Orlando. Fifty people who bear the same image of God that you and I bear are now dead, with many others wounded and traumatized. Just a couple hours before I was speaking to a church about being people of peace and reconciliation. But now I feel the dissonance between being a people of peace and reconciliation among such hatred and violence because part of me knows that Christians in America are not really perceived as people of peace and reconciliation.

Whenever such macabre violence takes place, there is always a response. We want to voice our frustration as well as show our solidarity with the victims. But what next? Whenever mass-shootings occur there are a lot of other questions  raised. What do we do about gun violence? Mental health screening? Terrorism? And on and on the questions go. These questions bring out the best and worst of society, which is all available for instantaneous access through social-media. For some of the best responses, we have learned of some Muslims who gathered in prayer for the victims. It has also been reported that several Chick-fil A restaurants, founded by Christians who have infused Christian ideals into their business, in Orlando opened their restaurants to serve food to those lining up to donate blood.

But then there’s the ugliness, revealing questions how much animosity, discrimination, and self-interest above the interests of others shapes our thinking − Christians included. Not even a day passed and social-media was already filling up with Islamophobia and homophobia. Some of the same old political antagonisms began making their rounds out of fear that our individual rights are at risk, which is ironic considering that those murdered have already lost their rights. In the worst case scenario, there are even some professing Christians that twist the Bible in such perverse ways, like this Sacramento Baptist Pastor, that they praise evil as good.

Something is very wrong when our Christianity sounds more like American politics, Pharisaical judgmentalism, and anything else other than Jesus! And somethings got to change.

Most Christians I know want a society that reflects the values of Christianity. Fair enough. But know this… We can sing God Bless America to our hearts content and invoke the name of God in public discourse but that won’t do diddly squat. The mentioning of God in public doesn’t make a society Christian anymore than wearing a Stetson Western Hat makes one a cowboy. Change happens as we embody the gospel as our living faith, our way of life and that happens by first realizing that our way of life should reflect the life Jesus Christ lived himself. And if we want a “Christian” society, that is a society where there is love rather than hatred, peace rather than violence, reconciliation rather than division, etc… the presence of the kingdom of God, then it is upon Christians to show the way!

The apostle Paul desired that Christ would be formed in us because God’s redemptive goal is that we become conformed to the image of Christ (cf. Rom 8:29; Gal 4:19). Our formation in Christ must change and reimagine for us what it means to be Christian, how we read the Bible, and how we act as living embodiments of the gospel. If our understanding of Christianity, the way we read the Bible, and how we live does not resemble the life Jesus Christ lived, then we are wrong. This isn’t a call to perfectionism but a call to become the people Jesus gave his own life for us to be, and to stop trying to justify versions of Christianity that sound more like America or the Pharisees than Jesus Christ.

I don’t have the answers for how the Federal and State Governments should deal with the issues of violence, terrorism, and many other relevant issues. I really sure that I don’t have all the answers as to how embodying the gospel works itself out with every different issue. But I am sure that America doesn’t need you and I or any other Christians to argue about who should be the next President, how to address gun violence or terrorism, and so forth. What America does need, whether the nation knows it or not, is for us who are Christians to be Christians all the more and be, as local churches, living embodiments of the gospel demonstrating why the gospel of Jesus Christ is good news. Let’s do this!

Church Renewal: Becoming The Gospel

For churches seeking a minister, a common theme seems to be the question of how to evangelize and grow as a church. Some churches realize this question is bigger than any simple answer while others seem as though the church just needs a minister who is good at starting new programs. This desire is certainly laudable but I would like to suggest that this is placing the cart before the horse. I’m not against programs, evangelism, and other ministries but any such movement and the way a church organizes itself for that movement must flow from the way a it follows Jesus and embodies the gospel among the community.

I’m reading Michael J. Gorman’s book Becoming The Gospel: Paul, Participation, and Mission, since it relates to my Doctor of Ministry studies. As the title suggests, Gorman argues that the churches Paul ministered among were not called just to believe the gospel but also become the gospel. This is what I mean when speaking of the way a church must follow Jesus and embody the gospel. Gorman describes this becoming the gospel as “…the church is a living exegesis of the gospel of God” (p. 43). That is, the local church serves as a faithful interpretation of the gospel, which is how the disciples participate in the mission of God.

[Let me pause here and point out too that faithful interpretation of the gospel does not mean a reproduction of first century, fifth century, sixteenth century, or even twentieth century ecclesial forms, as the interpretation must always speak contextually in the social-anguage of the local community but that is really another issue. I just want to be clear that we are not talking about restoring any past easier segment of the church, this is about participating in God’s mission of restoring life by reconciling people to be a new creation in Christ. Now back to the point.]

For Gorman, by becoming the gospel, a church becomes a proclamation of the gospel in word and deed. This must happen both in an inward (“centripetal”) and outward (“centrifugal”) direction. However, the deed of the gospel must always proceed the word of the gospel. Those worried about whether this diminishes the evangelistic need of teaching the gospel to those who do not belong to Christ need not worry. Such evangelism will happen naturally as the church becomes the gospel in deed.

Driving this point even further, Gorman says, “As they [local churches] become the gospel, they will have opportunities to speak the gospel” (p. 45). What he is getting at is the natural response of a church speaking the gospel by virtue of being what a church is always called to be, an embodiment of the gospel or, to use his words again, a living exegesis of the gospel. He illustrates this point by referring to a barking dog, which never needs someone to instruct it to bark… Dogs know naturally when to bark and how to bark so as to alert of a danger, warn a possible intruder, etc… Ergo, when churches become the gospel, they will naturally know how and when to speak the gospel.

So why is this so important? Beyond the need for local churches to become living embodiments of the gospel (which is immensely important), this also has something to say about not putting the cart before the horse. Local churches want to engage their community, evangelizing and ministering to people outside the body of Christ, which is a good thing. But instead of focusing on that per se, which is the cart, focus on the horse. That is, the focus should be on the  formation of disciples who learn how to follow Jesus and embody the gospel amongst themselves and within their local community. So instead of asking how to develop a new evangelistic program, a church might ask:

  • What does it mean to live as a follower of Jesus and what is involved?
  • What changes (repentance) are necessary in order for a church to continue following Jesus?
  • What particular practices are vital for embodying the gospel among various gatherings, different neighborhoods, and even in the home?
  • What means of creative expression might help make this living gospel contextually intelligible among the local community?

I’m thinking out loud a bit with these question but I believe that by asking them and listening for how the Spirit of God speaks in the conversation, churches will begin seeing the way forward. When that happens, the beginning of renewal among local churches is at hand.

On Judgment: They’re People, Not Problems

So there’s this trending video of a woman walking through a Target store as she holds up her Bible and rants about the evil of the devil and Target over the retail chain’s new transgender restroom policy. I haven’t linked the video here or shared it on any social-media platform because I refuse to give publicity to such stunts. If you want to see the video, do a Google search you’ll also see how effective she was in winning the masses to her viewpoint. And yes, I’m being sarcastic.

Like the infamous protests of the Westboro Baptist Church, this woman has the right to freely express her opinions and I have the right to mine. So when I saw the video clip, my reaction was a big sigh. After all, regardless of our opinions about the restroom policies of Target, it seems pretty stupid for someone to go waving their Bible around a store as they rant and carry on (= judgment). Such tactics may have had their place in some other bygone cultural era but not now… not in the twenty-first century of a post-Christendom society like much of America has become. Of course, I doubt this woman thinks about that or thinks much of what Jesus had to say about judging of others.

“Do not judge, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven.” – Jesus of Nazareth (Luke 6:37, NIV)

But as I thought about it more, I realized that a lot of people are quick to judge others. Everywhere we turn, people are passing judgment on others.

Judging Others

As a side gig to earn some extra money, I’ve been driving for Uber and do so mostly in the city of Baltimore. Like most cities, Baltimore has its share of social challenges. One of those challenges is a seemingly growing number of homeless people, both men and women, who either sleep in tents underneath overpasses or move around from shelter to shelter. When they’re not sleeping, they are standing at an intersection panhandling for money… a dollar or two from every willing motorist who is willing to spare a little extra cash.

While driving for Uber, I have heard a few riders make some rather condescending remarks (= judgment) about the panhandlers. It’s frustrating to hear how people who just finished eating dinner at an upscale sushi bar or steakhouse can so easily and so callously talk about the homeless. In fact, what this often brings to mind is Herman Melville’s powerful one-line critique of the well-off who pass judgment on the poor.

“Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.” – Herman Melville

However, the other night something scary happened. As I was making a turn, a man panhandling for money was struck by another motorist. The man was flipped over the hood of the car, landing on his head and shoulders. It was scary because what turned out to be a spilled soda looked life, from a slight distance, blood flowing on the ground. The last thing I or anyone else wants to see is someone else seriously hurt or killed. Fortunately, other than a few bumps and scratches, the man appeared to be ok. The driver stopped and was visibly upset, worried that she had seriously hurt someone. Myself and a couple of other motorists got out of our vehicles to help the man who had been hit while waiting for the police and EMS to arrive on scene.

That gave me a chance to talk with both the man who had been hit by the car as well as the driver who hit him. The man’s name was Dan and the driver’s name was Chelsie. It was good to learn both of there names because that meant I had to see them both as people. And they both are people! Though they both have two different lives, they are nonetheless people. That is also to remember that they both are someone’s child, perhaps someone’s brother and sister, someone’s old classmate. The people we meet every day are people just like you and I.

As I was driving home later, I realized that it’s easy to become desensitized to the city and all of it’s challenges. It’s easy to see a bunch of inconsiderate drivers and forget that they are people with real lives, perhaps even a life that is unraveling and full of pain. Of course, I’m never one of those inconsiderate drivers so… Oh wait! It’s also easy to see panhandlers on every street corner and presume to know why they’re begging for money (= judgment) and to see them not as people with real lives, with real problems and real stories, though tragic as they probably are, of which I have been spared (but for the grace of God, there go I!).

Becoming More Like Jesus

I don’t have the answer to all the social challenges face America, whether it’s homelessness, transgender rights, or else. What I do know is that we must resist judgment and condemnation, opting instead to engage people and get to know them by name. When we get to know someone by name, we see them as a person rather than a problem, and people are always people we must love rather than problems we must overcome. I am not saying that we can never have any convictions about what is right and wrong or by engaging people that our understanding of right and wrong must change. Sometimes our encounters with other people should and will move us to adjust our views and sometimes they won’t and shouldn’t but that is besides the point. What must change is us… you and I!

Rather than judging and condemning people we hardly know, if we even know them at all, we must become present with them and engage them so that we can get to know them a little more. That’s true for the transgender person standing in line at Starbucks with us, it’s true for the person panhandling for money at the intersection on our way home from work, and it’s true for our neighbor who doesn’t speak English too well, who has different political and religious beliefs than us, and it’s even true for the neighbor who’s favorite football team is the rival of our favorite football team. Though we cant strike up a conversation with everyone, it is to say that instead of passing judgment we should get to know the people we are quick to judge. When we do, what changes is us. We become more understanding, full of compassion, and eager to show mercy. And that means we become more like Jesus.

And if we still feel that someone or some organization has made a wrong decision, then I have a suggestion. Rather than going on a public rant I would like to suggest that we pray about it. That too seems more like Jesus!