Church Leadership: No Surprises!

One of the things I stress with churches and particularly other church leaders is not dropping any surprises. By surprises, I mean saying or doing anything that is controversial or will have a significant impact on the church without discussing it first with other leaders.

Perhaps a couple of examples might help explain more. What I’m talking about could be a minister who preaches a sermon on a controversial subject without even so much as letting the other ministers and elders know so that they can be prepared for the reaction. Or perhaps its an elder who announces the beginning of a search for an additional minister without ever talking about it with the ministers and elders. I know of churches where each of these examples have occurred and nothing good came of such surprises. Of course, I could give other examples too.

In conversing with different churches, dropping a surprise does nothing except creating frustration, distrust, and consequently unnecessary conflict. The problem with such surprises begins with the fact that it makes the rest of the leaders look incompetent before others when others approach them with questions only too see that they are caught off guard. When the leaders of a church appear incompetent, they are viewed as incompetent and their ability to lead is made even more difficult.

Another problem with dropping a surprise is the internal distrust and frustration it creates among leaders. When one leader, such as a minister or elder, drops a surprise, it says to the rest of the leaders that they cannot be trusted enough for the leader to seek their input first. Also, instead of working as a team, one individual places him/herself above the others. That is essentially an insult to the rest of the leaders which only makes for a more dysfunctional leadership, especially if this sort of behavior is tolerated.

It’s better to have no surprises! If a leader is about to say or do something that has the potential for controversy or making a significant impact on the church, it is something that should be discussed with other leaders first. And not just in a quick impromptu meeting but with enough time for prayer and discernment so that the leadership is not only prepared but supportive. If a leader is not sure then it’s better to discuss. The old adage “Do first and ask for forgiveness later” may work but that currency is very small and once it is spent, anything else will only create trouble.

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