Reclaiming The Way of Jesus

As you know, Christianity began as a very counter-cultural movement of Jesus followers. As communities of believers, these disciples gave total allegiance to Jesus and proclaimed him, who was crucified, as the resurrected Lord and Messiah. The result was marginalization from society and sometimes even persecution. Yet, with all the resistance and animosity towards this movement, it continued growing and spreading. Today Christianity has spread around the globe and continues spreading with its proclamation of Jesus, doing so even in places where followers of Jesus are still oppressed and sometimes persecuted.

A lot of significant events have happened since the first Easter, some for the good and some not. One of these significant events was the conversion of the Roman Emperor Constantine in the early fourth century. After his conversion, Constantine issued the Edict of Milan giving legal status to Christianity as a religion and brought an end to persecution. This new status meant also meant a new challenge for Christianity as a movement.

Following the conversion of Constantine, as Christianity found favor with the state, an alliance was formed between church and state. This relationship between the church and state resulted in the eventual formation of a Christendom, a geopolitical reality in which the values and practices of society were mandated by the church. With such power came corruption and a lot of bad, including religious wars that eventually gave rise to secularism and the emergence of modernism. The result in Europe and now in North America has been the slow and steady decline of Christendom.

Even though the U.S. Constitution has maintained a separation between Church and State, America was still very much a Christendom society (was being the key word), Though there are still some local cultures, particularly across the Bible-belt, where Christendom still lingers to some extent, America has become a post-Christendom society.

Our calling is faithfulness to Jesus, living as his followers. Whether or not such faithfulness is attractive or expedient is inconsequential. What matters is our faithfulness!

As you know, as Christians, our way forward is always in following Jesus. But as we renew our call to live as followers of Jesus in a post-Christendom society, I suggest we should give more consideration of the ways that America has often colonized our faith. For far too long Christianity in America has been a faith in which its adherents, Christians, have believed that one could serve both church and state. While that might be possible for some, for far too many, it seems, this has led to serving the aims (telos) of the state rather than the aim of the gospel. Christianity becomes a privatized belief expressed on Sunday while the rest of life is rather coherent with the values of the state… politically, economically, and so forth. Our faith in Jesus must redefine our entire life. The gospel must become the reality that shapes our values and practices, thereby redefining our lives so that Jesus’ way of life becomes our way of life − easy to talk about but much more difficult to do.

So here is where I want to take this post and the reason I wrote it. One question we have to answer is whether the way of Jesus will be our way period or only our way only when it makes sense with whatever circumstances we are facing. In other words, is our belief in Jesus merely utilitarian or is it our gospel? As the authors of the book StormFront write:

The church that lives by the gospel is called by that gospel to a different kind of life. The church is called to model a form of life in which faithfulness, love, and allegiance are not merely utilitarian virtues to be discarded when inconvenient, but rather the bedrock upon which life is built. Participating in resurrection life means living as if love really is stronger than death, as if faithfulness really is more powerful than the naked pursuit of self-interest. In the midst of a society that believes that all bets must be hedged, that all loyalties must be conditioned upon self-interest, the church dares to live differently (pp. 69-70).

Our calling is faithfulness to Jesus, living as his followers. Whether or not such faithfulness is attractive or expedient is inconsequential. What matters is our faithfulness! But I also believe the way of Jesus in which we live as humble servants who love one another, our neighbors, and even our enemies, is a beautiful life that many are looking for and the only life that will endure.

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