Does Your Church Have Faith?

In terms of work, serving as a minister is my second vocation. Besides working for my father, who owned a small excavating business, for a few years after high-school, I also worked four years as a machinist. It was during these years that I became a follower of Jesus, began to sense a call to ministry, and eventually returned to college in order to engage in biblical and theological studies in preparation for ministry.

Though it sounds simple, this journey was far from easy. Many difficulties came, most notably the death of my son Kenny in the summer of 2002. Yet long before Kenny’s death came the first test and it had to do with whether or not I could step forward in faith or go backwards to what was known, manageable, and predictable.

It was the spring of 1999 and my wife and I, newly married, were living in Rolla, Missouri where my wife had a teaching job nearby. I had a machining job that paid a quarter above minimum wage which irritated me knowing that I had left behind a machinist job in LaPorte, Indiana that paid nearly three times what minimum wage was. Like most newlyweds, money seemed tight and that frustrated me… I mean, it really frustrated me. Though I was already accepted and scheduled to begin studies at Harding University in the fall, I told my wife that we should just move back to Indiana where she could get a teaching job and I could either get my old machining job back or take my brother’s offer up and go to work for a construction outfit through the Carpenter’s Union. Of course, you know the outcome. Thanks to the prayerful encouragement and persistence of my wife, we pressed ahead into the unknown and unpredictable.

There’s a reason why I am telling this story and it has to do with local churches and Christianity in America. But first a story about Israel and I think the point I want to make about local churches will make more sense.

Israel and the Uncertainty of the Wilderness

According to Exodus 12:40, Israel spent 430 years in slavery under Egyptian tyranny. That’s a long time. Given the brutal and harsh conditions that Israel suffered, Israel was eager for redemption. Yet once they found themselves in the wilderness, there feelings changed. Facing the perils of the journey as they encountered opposition, Numbers 14:2-3 tells us just how the Israelites felt:

“If only we had died in the land of Egypt, or if only we had perished in this wilderness! Why has the Lord brought us into this land only to be killed by the sword, that our wives and our children should become plunder? Wouldn’t it be better for us to return to Egypt?”

Would it be better if Israel returned to Egypt? Of course not! But when we consider the circumstances they were facing, we can better appreciate the question.

For Israel, the way ahead was full of uncertainty and well beyond their manageability. Regardless of the oppression was, 430 years allowed Israel to become well acclimated to life in Egypt. It became a predictable life in which they knew the rules and everything they needed to do in order to survive. It was a manageable life that they understood, whereas the journey ahead was full of risk that required faith rather than their own understanding which was well acclimated for the past. But the temptation of returning to the safe, predictable, and manageable past was great… “So they said to one another, ‘Let’s appoint a leader and return to Egypt’” (Num 14:4).

The Local Church, The Past, and the Future?

Come back to present day and the question facing many local churches. It’s the twenty-first century in American and Christians no longer exist in world that many local churches were established in. That was a world characterized by modernism and Christendom, two socio-political realities that predates America as a nation. It was a world shaped predominately by Christian rule and human reason as the sure foundation by which we could be certain about what is true and what is right. More importantly, it was the world that many local churches remain well-acclimated for… unlike the postmodern and post-Christendom world these churches find themselves among now.

Because churches now find themselves existing in a postmodern and post-Christedom world, they find themselves in a wilderness so to speak. The world of modernism and Christendom safe, predictable, and manageable because it was well-known territory. Despite the problems it created (and both modernism and Christendom were fraught with problems), local churches knew how to function for the sake of God’s mission. Ministry programs at the church building would attract people to the church and evangelistic tracts using human-reason as their teaching method helped bring people to Christ. But that was then!

Now local churches find themselves living in unchartered territory, the wilderness of a postmodern and post-Christendom world. The way forward seems uncertain. Follow Jesus… Yes! Embody the gospel… Yes! Embody the gospel in a contextualized manner… How? The context has changed and the rules that easily provided clear direction and certain in the past no longer work so easily. Sometimes they don’t seem to work at all.

Now stepping forward in an unpredictable and uncertain world is risky and very uncomfortable at times. It requires faith but no amount of faith will eliminate the anxiety and the temptation to think that it would be easier if we just return to the past. In fact, many church will attempt to go back. I think this explains why some churches continue to talk about creating more building-centric programs, thinking that people will come if they build it. It is also, I believe, why in my own tribe, the Churches of Christ, many churches and Christians have become enamored with the book Muscle and a Shovel (despite it’s numerous theological problems (see John Mark Hicks 3-part review here, here, and here)… because despite the sectarianism and legalism of the past, most Churches of Christ know how to function in that past culture. Even though returning to the past will not help in learning how to engage among the new cultural territory, returning to the past is more comfortable than doing the messy task of faith which is continuing to journey forward through the wilderness learning how to live as a colony of heaven in an unChristian world.

One Final Word

The question churches face in the wilderness is whether they will try returning to the past or continue stepping forward. It’s a question of faith. It’s the question I faced in Rolla, MO, the question Israel faced in the wilderness, the question many other people of God have faced on occasions, and the question facing local churches in America today. How the question is answered is either a matter or faith or a lack of faith.

In the meantime, remember that Israel made to the promise land not by their own strength but by their faith in the God who delivered them. The church of Jesus Christ will make it too not by her own strength but by faith in the God whose promise in Christ is sealed by the Spirit dwelling among the church. I’m tired of reading article about the ten reasons why millennial won’t… or the ten steps every church needs to do in order to… At the risk of oversimplifying the journey ahead, churches just need to press forward in following Jesus and learning how to embody the gospel in contextualized manners. It’s a messier task filled with unpredictability, requiring discernment bathed in prayer and scripture but the church today is not the first to make this journey. So press ahead!

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3 responses to “Does Your Church Have Faith?

  1. Some really good thought and application Rex! I have been immersing myself in 1 John recently. Maybe just a thought but John sits in prison at a very old age and has seen the early church go through some very difficult times. (Jesus said it would go this way!). Anyway so in the midst of it all and everything he has seen and been through, in the looking back, John resorts to Jesus’s most fundamentalist teaching of loving one another. I just can’t help but think it still holds the keys to successful anything. I know it sounds ambiguous but as our Lord states, everything hangs on it. If we could only get this right then we needn’t worry about the building, the program, the ect. What if at the heart of everything we did was to seek to put others first and humble ourselves. It should be at the heart of every sermon preached and every lesson teached and every action we seek. I know I sound rather simplistic but sometimes with all the church chatter I wonder if we are trying to build our Towers of Babel of a corporate nature and forgetting we must be busy with the question of “am I my brother’s keeper?”. Perfect love will cast out our fears, we just need that to be on the front burner.

    • Yes!!! You’re not being too simplistic; the trouble is that we often want to over complicate. Love has everything to do with it.

      When God redeemed Israel from Egypt, he did so not just to make them his people but so that through Israel the rest of the world would come to know him and be his people too (Deuteronomy makes this missional point). However, God did not give Israel an evangelistic tract or an outreach program. What he gave them was the Law which would characterize their way of life and as we know from Jesus, everything about the Law was so that Israel would love God and their neighbors.

      I’m not opposed to strategic planning so that churches can serve in organized ways but rather than trying to fit some one-size-fits-all evangelistic tract or outreach program into different local churches (who are all gifted in different ways), the way forward has to do with learning how to embody the gospel of Jesus Christ in a contextualize manner among local communities and that will always lead the church to loving God as we love one another, our neighbors, and even our enemies. That is how local churches live as the light to the world.

      Thank you for your wonderful comment!

  2. Christianity started with a man and most of his inner circle being executed by the authorities. Christianity was also illegal for centuries, and yet it survived. It can survive today if its leaders teach the tenets of the faith which few ministers want to mention. There is a lot of gospel that can be covered throughout the year and so little of it was ever discussed. Everything was about Paul and the church. For too many years holy week was ignored in the cofC. It took me a few years of attending Anglican services between Palm Sunday and Easter to realize just what all happened within one week. Between Friday morning and Sunday morning no one on the earth knew what would happen. There is no mention of the resurrection before Easter Sunday. The question of Good Friday is “what, if anything, will happen?”. I think ignoring Holy Week really hurt.

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