Holy Lovers

Last Sunday I preached from First Peter about living into the hope we have. The issue is really about the holiness of the church. The apostle Peter instructs us saying, “but, like the Holy One who call you, become holy yourselves in all of your conduct, for it is written, ‘You shall be holy, because I am holy’” (1 Pet 1:15-16).*

Holy Is?

Like many common religious terms, the word holy has just enough familiarity that we think we understand it. Consequently, it’s tempting to never inquire any further about what becoming holy means.

That opens the door for a lot of misunderstanding. In the biblical narrative holiness is not merely an abstract concept. Holiness, or the lack of, is displayed through concrete actions. Due likely to Puritan influence, the first thing that usually comes to mind for us when it pertains to holiness is avoiding the “works of the flesh” (Gal 5:19-21). That’s certainly a part of living holy lives but this is much more involved in becoming holy.

Becoming Holy Lovers

Peter’s instruction to become holy includes the quote “You shall be holy, because I am holy” which comes from Leviticus 19:2. In that context God is calling Israel to regard themselves as separate from the rest of the nations and giving them instructions for how they are to live as the distinguished (consecrated) people of God who are separate from the nations. The first thing we need to realize is that our identity is the church. We are the body and bride of Christ… who happen to live in America, not Americans who happen to go to church.

Once we understand our identity as the church, we must live like it. Becoming holy is to become like God, who is holy. Again, this is not an abstract concept. The holiness of God is displayed through his actions. Chief among these actions is God’s redemptive pursuit of his creation, motivated by his love for creation and his desire to see justice and righteousness done among creation. This is why God gives Israel the Law after redeeming them from Egypt.

Therefore, as Peter insists that we are called to obedience he points us back to God’s redemptive act in Christ. Peter wants us to understand that holy living involves reflecting the redemptive character of God. So Peter insists that we, who are called to become holy, must embrace a “mutual love” as we “love one another” (1 Pet 1:22).

The Contrast

The instruction to become holy is an expansive call but we should not forget that it involves loving one another as brothers and sisters in Christ. Just as the love of God is displayed in the self-giving act of sacrificing his Son for our sake, so we must love one another through self-giving acts. Such actions include the ability to remain patient with each other, forgive each other, serve one another as needs arise, and so forth. This is why I titled this article Holy Lovers.

This may not seem like a big deal but it is. I think of all the stories I’ve heard and even encountered at times that involve stressful work-place drama. I’m talking about sordid accounts of gossip, slander, gamesmanship, politics, and other deeds that make for misery. Now imagine a society where instead of stepping over others, people lower themselves to lift each other up with grace and mercy. It’s a holy society and that’s what we’re called to become. The contrast is huge!

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* This article was originally published in Connecting 29 (November 12, 2014), a biweekly publication of the Columbia Church of Christ, and has been reformatted for this blog.

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