Discipleship and Prayer

I’ve thought about writing on developing a rhythm of prayer for several months but have hesitated, as I don’t want come off as tooting my own piety which truly is nothing to brag about. However, in writing this, which involves sharing something of my own prayer discipline, the hope is that it might help someone else in this journey of following Jesus.

The Problem With Prayer

To begin with, let me give you a little background so that you’ll understand my struggle a bit more. The Christian tradition I come from, the Churches of Christ, is really big on pot-luck fellowships and Bible study. Have a cook-out or a Bible-study and you can expect a decent turn out. Invite people over for a time of  praying together and the turn probably won’t be so great. I know this from experience. This isn’t to say that people from the Churches of Christ don’t believe in prayer, it’s just doesn’t hold the same value as eating and studying the Bible.

But here’s the deal: As followers of Jesus, disciples, prayer is a vitally important aspect of our life. Prayer was an important discipline for Jesus, who would get up early in the morning so that he could go and pray in a quiet place (cf. Mk 1:35). Yet when we haven’t learned to value prayer like this it’s difficult to establish a disciplined rhythm of prayer in life. I suppose it’s even harder to do so in our world which seems constantly on the move, where we have hand-held computers in our hand almost the entire day.

In the past, I’ve tried remaining vigilant about praying every-time I get in my truck and drive somewhere, even if it’s just to the store. This, however, is mainly just a prayer asking God to see where he is at work so that I might join him in his work, which I also forget to do at times. There’s nothing wrong with such a prayer but in reading through the Psalms, I am convinced that prayer is more than just this. I also like to go for walks (it’s great exercise) and will pray at times during these walks but as someone who struggles with remaining focused and keeping my attention (ADHD)… Let’s just say that since my mind is thinking in a thousand different directions, neither praying or reflecting comes easy on these walks.

A Rhythmic Approach to Prayer

Wanting to become more disciplined in praying, I’ve developed a rhythmic approach that I want to share with you. I don’t know if someone else has developed a similar approach but I’ve really found this helpful. However, before I do let me share two important disclaimers. First, though we should be praying people just as Jesus was, I don’t believe this means that we must go about praying exactly as Jesus did. That is, the idea is becoming more disciplined in the practice of prayer but we can do that without necessarily getting up at dark-thirty in the morning for a trip into the woods for prayer. Second, the approach I am sharing with you is intended as descriptive rather than prescriptive. In other words, my way is not the only way. So if it helps, great! If it doesn’t work for you, that’s fine too. But if I encourage you to become more intentional about the discipline of prayer then this post is worth the effort.

Besides praying on walks, praying with my family before bed, I have started practicing a rhythm of prayer based on the A.C.T.S. acronym. Perhaps you’ve heard of this before but for those who haven’t, this acronym stands for AdorationConfessionThanksgiving, and Supplication. While the acronym has four parts, the rhythm involves five times of prayer throughout the day that runs as follows:

  • The Prayer of Adoration at 9:00 AM (Morning Prayer) praises God for who he is as Creator and Redeemer. Reflecting on all that God is and all the ways that he is at work in the world, this prayer exalts him for this.
  • The Prayer of Confession at 12:00 PM (Noontime Prayer) involves a confession of faith and confession of sins. This prayer professes the fundamental beliefs of being Christian (i.e., “Jesus is Lord!”) and admits the things done and not done that are wrong and therefore are sin.
  • The Prayer of Thanksgiving at 3:00 (Afternoon Prayer) involves thanking God for his blessings and grace. That is, in light of all that God has done, including the continued grace and mercy he extends, this prayer expresses gratitude.
  • The Prayer of Supplication at 6:00 (Evening Prayer) involves petitioning God for the various needs I encounter. This is the prayer where personal needs as well as the needs of others are brought to God’s attention.
  • The Lord’s Prayer at 9:00 (Nighttime Prayer) is simply a recitation of The Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:9-13). In some ways, this prayer is a rehearsal of adoration, confession, thanksgiving, and supplication.

As I suggested earlier, this rhythm doesn’t exclude other prayers and if you can take some time out every day for a prayer walk, that’s good too!

Let me share a couple of helpful ideas. One thing that I’ve done is scheduled these prayer times into the calendar on my iPhone. When the time comes for prayer, a little “alert” sound will ring letting me know what time it is. So if you have some sort of smart-phone, you can use the calendar to help establish this rhythm for you. Lastly, there are some days where my rhythm is thrown off and occasionally I blow it off (I’m a work in progress). That will happen to you as well but don’t fret about it and don’t be a legalist about setting a rhythm like this. I am convinced that having a disciplined rhythm of prayer is vital as we follow Jesus as but the rhythm itself is not the Lord. So if you miss, then just pick up where you left off.

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Do you find this might helpful? What other ideas you have or how you can incorporate a rhythm of prayer into your life? What suggestions do you have for me and others?

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