Trick or Treat Observations

This past Wednesday evening I took my children out “trick-or-treating.”  This has become a yearly tradition where I take the children out because they know that I’ll let them get more candy than momma will. 🙂  Here are some observation I made:

  • Trick-or-treating is a great community activity that brings neighbors together.  Several town-homes had neighbors from nearby homes congregating as they handed out candy.  Society could use more of this.
  • Taking the children out is also a great way for me to meet people in the community.  As a minister, it is always good to meet other local people.
  • Some people/families spend a lot of money to decorate for Halloween.  It’s not for me but I enjoy seeing the fruit of their labor.  I am also glad that this year, all of the decorations were rated “PG” (after all, trick-or-treating is for children).
  • Communities should pass ordinances that make it illegal for people old enough to shave or wear a bra to go out trick-or-treating for themselves.  Just saying…
  • It is very important to me to teach my children to be courteous and thankful to the people who are freely giving them candy.  They do this.  What I did not expect was for my 4 year-old son to start getting specific and asking people if they had a Milky Way candy bar.  Naturally, I put a stop to this but it made me think of how quickly an inherently innocent activity can create the dark-side of consumerism.
  • 99% of the treats passed out is store bought miniature candy-bars.  When I was a child, I could count on receiving some fresh homemade cookies, a caramel apple or two, and some fresh made hot apple cider.  Those days are gone because of too much food tampering and other devious stuff.  Sad!  I feel like children today have been deprived in some way.  So in some strange way, the “trick” has been played on them.

Did you take children out trick-or-treating?  Hand out candy?  If so, are there any observations you made?

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4 responses to “Trick or Treat Observations

  1. Trick or treating is just now coming around here in Switzerland. There were more children who were out this year than there were last year. When they come to my door they either sang a song or recited a poem. (Had no idea what they were saying!). Very polite, and many said thank you in English, for my benefit.

    Enjoyed your observations and glad to hear you found it all family friendly. Have known some Christians who don’t participate because they don’t want to join in any celebrations involving witches, devils, etc. I suppose if you take it that way you shouldn’t celebrate Halloween, but agree with you it is a fun way to get the family out and mingle some with the neighbors. Yeah, I remember all the homemade goodies, too bad those days are gone. And for those who give out alternative items (like healthy snacks, pencils, toothbrushes, etc)….no, don’t bother!

  2. Yes, Rex, they were really wonderful songs and poems and I could tell that the boys who recited the poem had worked hard to memorize it. It was really sweet! Most of the kids were from my neighborhood. They know me (and Izzy) and know I only speak English. It is amazing how much we can communicate with knowing only a few words of each others language. Most children know some English as it is taught at a very young age in school. Actually, most of these children know at least 3 languages.

    Was trick or treating in your neighborhood postponed because of the storm? Your kids looked really cute! Take care, God bless.

    • That is neat. Spoken words are roughly only about a third of our communication, so it is very much a possibility to communicate even with language barriers.

      Any ways, trick-or-treat was not postponed. Although there are communities in the Baltimore/D.C. Metro area that are without power, have trees down, and have experienced flooding, over all we faired much better than was expected and certainly much better than New Jersey and the NYC Metro area.

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