Category Archives: Theology

Do Christians Need Power?

In one sense, it seems laughable that anyone seeking to become President of the United States would make an appeal to Christian voters by promising Christians power. Of course, that is exactly what Presidential Candidate Donald Trump has apparently done by talking about Christians and saying that if he’s elected, “you’re going to have plenty of power.” But this post isn’t really about Donald Trump or any other Presidential Candidate. It’s about the Christians for whom such a promise of power is desired.

The Power of the Kingdom

When Jesus began his public ministry, the burning question for Israel had to do with the Kingdom of God. As a people who were living under the rule of Roman authority, Israel longed for God to make good on his promise which meant the restoration of his Kingdom. That was Israel’s hope.

As a prophetic voice, teaching with authority and performing all kinds of miraculous signs, Jesus raised the possibility that he was indeed the Messiah who would restore the Kingdom of God. Yet as Jesus defied some of Israel’s traditions, challenging the authority of the religious leaders, those in authority began to see him as a blasphemer and eventually would help conspire to have him crucified under the rule of the Roman Governor Pilate. However, God raised Jesus from death, vindicating him as Israel’s Messiah and so his disciples held out hope that he would restore the kingdom of God.

In Acts chapter one, the disciples asked Jesus when he was going to restore the kingdom. The question is about power but it is something that they still misunderstood. Jesus replies to his disciples saying, “It is not for you to know the times or dates the Father has set by his own authority. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses… (vv. 7-8). Jesus was assuring his disciples that they would have power but not the kind of power they have in mind. Receiving the Holy Spirit to live as witnesses of Jesus is not the power of militant or political coercion; it is rooted in the same power of the cross. The Kingdom of God appears as the disciples live as witness of Jesus, the crucified and resurrected Messiah, embodying his way of life as their way of life.

Pursuing The Wrong Kingdom

Maybe Christians today have forgotten this or maybe they just don’t want to embrace it since it’s not desirable like the power of militant and political coercion! Many Christians read Acts with admiration for the way the early church so rapidly grew, dreaming of how their own local churches could experience such growth. Many other believers lament the decline of Christianity’s influence in much of North America, hoping that somehow America could return to whatever Christian values they believe the nation once had. All the while, Christianity in America appears ever closer to losing sight of Jesus and the gospel he proclaimed even as local churches are declining as their witness is becoming marginalized.

Perhaps that sounds overly critical and you think I am painting with too broad of a brush stroke. Perhaps I am and perhaps I am too critical. However, the only reason why any Presidential Candidate is appealing to Christians (though certainly not all) with an assurance of giving them power is because there is a large enough group of Christians who desire such. So here is an important truth: The desire for such power says more about Christians than it does Donald Trump or any other Presidential Candidate and what it says is not good… it even raises the question of idolatry.

The desire for any form of militant and political power places Christians with the  masses who demanded that Pilate crucify Jesus. Don’t get me wrong! I’m not saying that a desire for coercive power is a desire to crucify Jesus. What I am suggesting is that those who demanded the crucifixion of Jesus from Pilate wanted the Kingdom of God but not on the terms of the God the Father revealed in Jesus. They wanted a kingdom in which they ruled with political coercion and were ready to use militant force in order to secure that power. The desire to protect and preserve Christian values and a Christendom culture among America, which is the sentiment that Trump is appealing to, is a desire to have power over others and that is the same desire as those who crucified Jesus. But there is a cost… The price of attaining political power over others is the Kingdom of God because nobody can rule among this world and participate in the Kingdom of God. Only Jesus has received the authority to rule this world!

A Final Word

I am writing this because there are other followers of Jesus who see the same problem, even if they might express it differently than I. My hope is that this might help raise awareness of the problem and provide a corrective that is rooted in the gospel of Jesus Christ. The local churches we fellowship with need us to speak out and call us back to the way of our crucified and resurrected Messiah, Jesus of Nazareth.

The pursuit of any coercive power is one we pursue to our own peril. However, the good news is that when we let go of the desire for such power, we gain the freedom to love one another and even love those whose beliefs, values, and lifestyle is drastically different then ours. Rather than wasting time trying to win political arguments about who should become the next President of the United States, we can spend time being present with people, loving and serving them, and showing them who Jesus is. This is the power of living by the Holy Spirit as witnesses of Jesus and it’s the only power we need! When we live by the power of the Holy Spirit as witness of Jesus, the Kingdom of God appears here on earth as it is in heaven!

The Good Muslim, Latino, and Black Man

Most Christians read the Bible. Still the best-selling book, according to the Guinness World Records, the Bible is available in numerous languages as well as more than enough English translations. For many Christians like myself and especially evangelicals, the Bible is regarded as the inspired word of God and therefore is regarded as authoritative in matters of faith. So it really goes without saying that reading the Bible is a good thing. But… as I have said before and will say again, how we read the Bible matters too!

In fact, how we read the Bible may matter more than whether or not we read the Bible. That’s because a bad reading of the Bible most surely leads to bad theological praxis, which means that a poor reading may be just as dreadful not reading the Bible at all.

The Interpretation of Loving Thy Neighbor

In the Gospel of Luke there is a story in chapter 10 about a lawyer, an expert in Jewish law, who approached Jesus with a question. The lawyer asked Jesus what he must do to inherit eternal life. So in v. 26 Jesus responded by pointing this lawyer back to what is written in the law. However, knowing that just reading the law does not necessarily mean that this lawyer will live out the intention of the law, Jesus also asked him about how he reads the law.

The question in v. 26 is pōs anaginōskeis and though some English translations differ, it is likely best rendered as “How do you read it? (NIV, ESV). The adverb pōs is a common interrogative asking “how” or “in what way.” The present tense verb anaginōskeis means “to read” and is referring to the law which Jesus has pointed the lawyer back towards in response to the question of inheriting eternal life. The question itself is about the lawyer’s “legal interpretation” of the law (cf. Green, The Gospel of Luke, 428). That matters because nobody just reads the law and does exactly what it says in literal fashion. Every reader is an interpreter and so how this lawyer or anyone else reads/interprets the law matters.

In the story, the lawyer goes on to correctly point out that the law is summed up with the two commandments of loving God and loving neighbor. Jesus agrees. But when the Lawyer continues, asking Jesus who exactly is a neighbor, Jesus presses in with the utmost of challenges… Jesus goes on to tell a story about a neighbor and in that story the neighbor happens to be a Samaritan (you can read the story of “The Good Samaritan” here). This is critical because Jesus is identifying a Samaritan, people whom the Jews hated, as a neighbor and therefore someone who this Jewish lawyer must love as his neighbor. Further more, when Jesus finishes the story by telling this lawyer to do as the Samaritan did, who acted with “mercy” (v. 37), he is telling him to treat all people with compassion (cf. Johnson, The Gospel of Luke, 175).

And Our Neighbors Are…

Going back to the question Jesus asked of how that lawyer reads the law, Luke is reminding us that how we read the Bible matters. However, the discussion here isn’t about how we understand the doctrine of end times or the doctrine of atonement correctly, not that such doctrines are unimportant. The discussion is about how we love our neighbor and whether our reading of the Bible moves us to love our neighbors as ourselves by extending compassion to all people.

If we leave the discussion right there, loving our neighbor as we love ourselves doesn’t seem so difficult. However, when we remember that Jesus spoke of a Samaritan in order to define just how this Jewish lawyer’s neighbor was, we must own up to the fact that our neighbors include those whom we just may in fact dislike, fear, and even hate.

For a White Christians living in America, like myself, the story told in Luke 10 is a reminder that our neighbors include people who are Black, Latino, and Muslim. I mention these three groups of people because of the tensions that still exists between them and many White people, including White evangelical Christians. It also seems necessary as certain politicians and talking heads preach a message of  fear and animosity among White evangelical Christian voters, appearing as guardians of their livelihood at the expense of compassion for minorities.

A Final Word

The story that Luke tells involves a question about how one expert in the law reads or interprets the law. It also raises a question for us Christians as to how we read or interpret the Bible. For Jesus, any reading of the law that allowed a Jew to disregard a Samaritan as a neighbor was wrong. For Christians then, particularly those of us who are White evangelical Christians living in America, any reading of the Bible that allows us to disregard a minority person as our neighbor is wrong. In fact, any reading of the Bible that allows us to disregard anyone as our neighbor is wrong.

The story itself tells us how Jesus expects us to treat our neighbors… with mercy! We must treat all people with such compassionate acts that they will know us as merciful people. It doesn’t matter how well versed we are in the doctrines of Nicene Christianity, how quickly we can recite passages of scripture, or even if we read our Bibles, if in doing so we fail to show mercy to all people. Any lack of mercy is a sure indicator that we are not reading and interpreting the Bible rightly. Showing mercy is how we love our neighbor as ourselves and just as our neighbor is the good Samaritan, so also our neighbor is the good Muslim, Latino, and Black man!

A Conversation About Jesus and Religion

Yesterday evening while driving for Uber in Baltimore I picked up a man I”ll call Sammy, who was born in India but was raised in America. I picked him up at a bar in Baltimore and I could tell he had a few drinks but he was a nice man and was telling me about his work, which involved working with clients all around the world. Then he asked me what I do and that’s where things became interesting.

I explained to Sammy that I’m a Christian and have spent the last ten plus years of my life serving as a minister with churches. Sammy then told me that he is not religious but respects anyone who is because religion normally make people better people. The conversation then went something like this…

Sammy: “Do you really believe in one God?”

Me: “Yes, I do.”

Sammy: “Do you believe Jesus is the only one who can save everyone?”

Me: “Yes, I do.”

Sammy then proceeded to share with me his difficulty in believing like I believe. He said that at the end of the day all religions teach us how to be nicer people to others and that’s what he thinks is important. Then Sammy said, “But you believe differently.”

I could tell he was waiting for a response but I paused for a moment as we were pulling up to his destination. Then I said, “Sammy, I believe that Jesus was crucified but that God raised him from death and exalted him as Lord… as the one who is King over all. That’s why he is the only one who can save everyone. Of course, if Jesus wasn’t raised from death then none of that really matters. But if he was, and I believe he was, and if you believe he was, then even if we don’t understand how God works all this salvation stuff out, we know that it is through Jesus that God saves because Jesus is the Lord… the King.”

Sammy stayed silent for a moment. Then he said, “Wow, I never thought of it that way before. I know I have to go now but thanks, I need to think about that more now.”

Christians… If God has raised the crucified Jesus from death and exalted him as Lord, as we confess, then may the Spirit empower us to boldly live as witnesses for this good news of Jesus the Messiah!

Imago Dei: They Belong to God

As I continue talking with different churches about serving as a minister with them, I have started driving for Uber in the city of Baltimore. It’s a way to earn some needed income for my family but it’s also proving to be a great way of listening and learning as I taxi people from one destination to another. Last night as I was driving though the city and seeing the myriad of different people, I began reflecting on God, creation, and the image of God. So here are some of the thoughts that came to my mind.

One of the great sins throughout history has been the objectification of other people. By objectification, we see others only as an object or means of serving us. It’s a self-serving sickness that reduces others to the value of whatever they can do for us. And sometimes that’s pretty cheap… a one night stand, a quick high, and so on. Sometimes the objectification of others has resulted in some of the great injustices throughout history such as the importation of humans to work as slaves.

The Bible tells us that all people are made in the imago dei, image of God, bearing the likeness of God (Gen 1:26-27; 5:1). Later on in life when asked about paying taxes to Ceasar, Jesus takes a coin that bears Caesars image and says to give it back to Caesar because it belongs to Caesar (Mk. 12:13-17). What Jesus is also saying, which is what we often miss, is that we dare not give ourselves to Caesar because we bear the image of God and therefore we are to worship/serve God. But here is a further point about people and the image of God.

Now let’s clarify a further point about the image of God and the others we encounter every day. The others, those we are so tempted to objectify for our own ends, bear the image of God and therefore they belong to God!

To recognize the image of God in other people and recognize that they belong to God means that they are not ours to do with as we please. They belong to God and we are to serve them as we would serve God. Whether it is our family, a person who has been visiting our church gatherings, the neighbor down the street and even the obnoxious neighbor down the street, the person panhandling money on the street corner, the person…

We cannot see people only as a means to an end, as a commodity to fulfill our needs. The world is a more enjoyable place when we instead regard others with the dignity of being a human-being, a person bearing the image of God. When we resist the easy temptation of objectifying others and instead serve them, we learn what it means to love God and love our neighbor as ourself.

Christian Witness, Baptism, and Politics

In the simplest of terms, Christians are called to live as witnesses of Jesus. Called together as church, Christians embody the good news of Jesus in order to show the victory of God. It is a victory that God has accomplished through the death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus, as a testimony of the new kingdom life. That’s also why Christians must remember their baptism into Christ.

In Romans 6, Paul reminds Christians that those who have been baptized have died with Jesus and have been raised into new life in him. Paul’s point, however, isn’t just to remind them their salvation and it’s certainly not about salvation in some escapist sense, so that Christians reduce this life only as something to come in some sweet bye and bye. Rather, Paul’s point is to remind Christians of the new life they have already received and must now participate in as the basis for embodying the good news by no longer continuing in sin but instead walking in the “newness of life.”

So in essence, Christian witness is not about overcoming evil but about the embodied witness of victory in Christ. It’s the task of proclamation by word and deed. It’s a proclamation that explaining to the world the way life which the world witnesses among Christians. Hence, it is nonsensical for Christians to proclaim Jesus as the one who has overcome evil and yet live as though the battle with evil has yet to be settled.

Even though there is still plenty of evil that persists this side of the second-coming, God has already ensured through the death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus that evil does not have the last word — not even death, known by the sting of sin, has victory anymore. So rather than trying to win some culture war or any other war, Christians are simply called to live as an embodied witness of the new victorious life in Christ.

Christian witness is not about overcoming evil but about the embodied witness of victory in Christ.

This is why Christians cannot engage in politics like the rest of society so often does. For starters, Christian witness is neither liberal nor conservative (Democrat, Republican, etc… if you will) because those platforms are not the new life in Christ which the church embodies. That is not too say that Christians can’t have a political opinion, can’t vote, etc… But it is a reminder that duty of Christians is not to be an evangelistic spokesperson for any national politic.

In addition to this, Christians must refrain from demeaning people and politicians whom they disagree with. It has become common-place in American politics to belittle and ridicule those who take and opposing political view. Words like “liberal” or phrases like “right-wing” are used as antagonisms, especially in social-media where it is so easy to speak in ways that would likely not happen in a face-to-face conversation. Unfortunately Christians, including myself, have engaged in politics like this. How ironic is it that politics, meant as a means of maintaining civility, has become so uncivil.

One of the instructions Paul had for Christians was to “speak evil of no one, to avoid quarreling, to be gentle, and to show every courtesy to everyone” (Tit 3:2, NRSV). This means that no matter how much one disagrees with a Presidential Candidate or even someone else’s opinion shared in the latest click-bait article or meme, all temptations to respond with ridicule and vitriol must be resisted. This is not to suggest that Christians cannot express disagreement but to say that all critical engagement must be gentle and courteous. Plus, when Christians do engage politics in a gentle and courteous manner, they portray themselves as someone safe that others can engage safely without the fear of being verbally shot down for having a different view. And that might open the door for Christians to say that while this or that political issue is important, there is something else far more important and it has to do with Jesus.

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I’ve watched and listened to both the Republican and Democrat Presidential debates. I have my opinions and I’m sure you do as well. But as America moves closer to another Presidential election, my prayer is that we (Christians) remember whose we are and therefore not lose sight of the witness we are to embody. May God, our Father in heaven, give us wisdom from the Spirit to speak and act as ambassadors of his Son, Jesus Christ!

As Scandalous As It Ever Was

If the grace of God were only about our own personal salvation, it would be easy. But when we are called to extend grace to others, especially whose sins are offensive to us, anger us, and disgust us, it becomes very difficult. Speaking to the elders of the church in Ephesus, the apostle Paul insisted that his only aim was to speak truthfully or “testify to the good news of God’s grace” (Acts 20:24). But what Paul had in mind was preaching a message that included both Jews and Gentiles. There’s the rub. That’s what made the grace of God scandalous then and it still remains as scandalous as it ever was.

When It All Comes Crashing Down

Growing up my younger brother and I loved watching wrestling, especially the Saturday Night Main Event where Hulkamania was sure to run wild on you. Hulk Hogan, with his 24-inch biceps and legions of Hulkamaniac fans, was the attraction. With great charisma and a good-guy persona, The Hulckster, as he was sometimes referred to, went on to have not only one of the most celebrated careers in wrestling entertainment and but an amazing career beyond the squared ring. Pretty good for one man, whose real name is Terry Bollea.

But that all came crashing down earlier this year when a secretly recorded video tape from 2006 was released that captured Hogan talking about his daughter dating a black man, using the N-word. Immediately Hogan became a cultural pariah, having committed what the American culture deems as a horrifically shameful sin. The backlash was swift as the wrath of culture’s judgment was meted out which included being fired from the WWE, the wrestling organization he helped turn into premiere franchise of its industry, who quickly put as much distance between the two of them as possible.

To be clear, what Hogan said was wrong and totally unacceptable! Using words that demean people for their race shows us just how much damage sin can do. Not only can sin have terrific consequences for our own life, it hurts others too and leads to anger, animosity, and deep divisions. But for someone who has apologized, the extension of grace is still unfathomable. Instead, with a few exceptions, the culture that we are has basically said with our judgment that Hogan is beneath us… what he has done is despicable and unbecoming of us, as though we ourselves have never done anything shameful and wrong.

Now please don’t misunderstand me. I am neither trying to mitigate the wrong that Hulk Hogan did nor defend his response. When anyone does wrong,  repentance is necessary and the very least, apologies should be offered for any harm done. However, the culture at large is a place where there are certain sins for which we distance ourselves from the guilty offender as though we are somehow better. To offer any kind of grace that would give the person a second-chance, a new start on life, is so unfathomable that it’s scandalous!

A Deep Theology of Grace

Contrast that with the theology of God’s grace that Paul is so adamant on testifying about. In Romans, Paul was writing to a church of Jewish and Gentile believers. The problem is that the Jewish believers were looking down upon the Gentiles, pointing to their shameful sins, while claiming superiority because they has the law of God which meant they belonged to God’s covenant and has circumcision as a sign of this position. But Paul will have none of that! He reminds this church that they all are sinners and are justified by God through faithfulness of Christ. In turn, Jewish and Gentile believers alike now live by their faith, of which the patriarch Abraham is an example of.

That is Paul’s argument in Romans chapters 1-4 and because of this grace, Paul unequivocally says, “Therefore, since we have been declared righteous by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ” (5:1). So these sinners, who are both guilty of very shameful acts, are not only “made righteous” (justified) but they are at “peace with God.” How can God just forgive such sinners and just set aside the wrong they have done? It’s a good question to ponder because it’s not just those sinners… those Jewish and Gentile believers whom God has made righteous? It’s us! By faith, we too are Justified and it is because Jesus died “for us” (5:8).

But this grace is even deeper. Paul says, “For if while we were enemies we were reconciled to God though the death of his Son, how much more, since we have been reconciled, will we be saved by his life” (5:10). Let me point out two things out about this passage:

  1. The word for “enemies” is from the adjective ἐχθρός which in the active (provided by the present-participle “being” verb ὄντες) sense describes someone who is hostile and opposing to God. In other words, while we were actively opposing God with our sin, God reconciled us through the death of Jesus. We might say that while we slapping God in the face with our sin, God reconciled us. 
  2. Verse 10 is also a rhetorical argument about salvation. Paul is saying that if God reconciled us through the death of his Son while we were actively being hostile to God, even more then will we be saved by the life of Jesus. In other words, if God reconciled us even as his enemies, then we can be confident that he will save us in Christ.

This is the grace of God! This is how God responds to us, who are sinners. He extends his grace, justifying us and reconciling us so that we are assured of our salvation in Christ. That is also the basis for which we can extend grace and mercy to others because we know that even as we were enemies of God, he extended his grace to us.

An Ever Relevant Message

We live in a culture whose capacity for any sort of grace seems to be shrinking. Commit any certain number of sins that our culture deems outrageously unacceptable and wrath of a public culture is unleashed, just as it was for Hulk Hogan. Grace is as scandalous as it ever was. It was when Paul wrote Romans and it is today. Why? Because the culture at large doesn’t believe that scandalous people deserve forgiveness and a second chance.

Not so with God and not so with his people, the church. As scandalous as the grace of God may be, it remains more than ever relevant. What a message for every local church to embody, to be a community where nobody looks upon another because we all know that we are a sinner as much as the next person… knowing that just as God has extended his grace to us, we must extend the message of grace in the way we speak and treat one another.

The grace of God is as scandalous as it ever was but if you get it… What a beautiful scandal to be caught up in!

Seeking With The Spirit

I’ve been writing some on how a local church lives as a community animated by the Holy Spirit. That naturally raises the question of how does this happen and, as I said in another post, that begins with repentance. Yet that is only where a church begins. There is more…

Two Modern Church Practices

Growing up as a child, there were two practices of the church that need mentioning here.

  1. Men’s Monthly Business Meetings. These meetings were open to any male member of the church and by that, I mean any baptized male. So at age nine, after being baptized, I was considered a man of the church and was asked to attend where I would vote along with the other men on any and all decisions. That’s right.. vote. Each meeting proceeded according to Robert’s Rules of Order because it was a business meeting. Whether the issue was buying a church van, giving support to a missionary, or else, as long as all the details appeared fiscally responsible, then a motion would be made, seconded, and approved by vote — democracy at its best.
  2. Monthly Congregational Singing. These singings we’re joyous occasions because I liked to sing and there wasn’t any sermon (how ironic now that I’m a preacher). Everyone present would name a hymn request and then the men capable of leading a hymn would take turns leading the requested hymns. Each singing would begin and end with the customary opening and closing prayers, and occasionally someone might read a passage of scripture but the primary reason for gathering was to sing hymns.

Now you are asking yourself, “Rex, what did these business meetings and congregational singings have to do with the church living as a community animated by the Spirit?” My answer is that they didn’t! Yet these practices were highly valued by the church of my youth and still are valued in some churches.

Why does this matter? Because when we read through the book of Acts about the beginning of the church, we don’t find the community of Christians engaged in either such practices. That’s not to say that they never came together to make decisions or to engage in worship through singing hymns… they surely did but the prioritized other practices that have been given very little priority among many churches today.

Two Ancient, Yet Relevant, Practices

There are two practices of the earliest Christians that need mentioning which are vital for churches discovering today how the Spirit seeks to lead them:

  1. Table Fellowship. This is a smaller gathering of Christians in a home around the table enjoying a meal together where everyone can engage in each other’s life. It is a time and place where deeper and more meaningful conversation about how God is at work in each other’s lives, how the scriptures bear upon each other’s lives, and how each person can lovingly encourage one another to embody the gospel of Jesus Christ. It is one powerful way in which the Holy Spirit, who dwells among each believer, works to reveal what must be done in order to participate in the mission of God.
  2. Prayer. This practice is rooted in the profound belief that Christians are incapable of embodying the gospel based on their own strength. On their own, fears and temptations will have mastery over them. But by creating space and committing time for prayer — whether it’s for family facing personal challenges, someone having an evangelistic conversation with a co-worker, the church seeking a bold vision for engaging the neighborhood, and so on — the church turns to the Sovereign Lord who, in a mysterious manner, gives power through the Spirit to overcome with faithful witness.

Part of the challenge in recovering these ancient practices is overcoming vulnerability and humility. You see as long as Christians only gather in large assemblies for worship, preaching/teaching, and fellowship better known as potluck meals, there will likely never be any deep engagement of life seeking participation in the mission of God. That’s because such engagement requires vulnerability and that is more likely to happen as believers gather for table fellowship. Similarly, as long as a church thinks it only needs to maintain its current way of life, believers will never come together for a committed time of prayer.

Don’t get me wrong! I’m all for gathering as a collective group for worship where the church can sing, read scripture publicly, here that scripture preached, etc… but that alone is insufficient. It’s very passive and doesn’t require much. Plus, few Christians really want to stand up in such large gatherings and say, by way of example, “I’m struggling to get along with my new neighbors of a different race and religion, what might I be doing wrong? Could you help me and pray for me that I might better love them as my neighbor?”

When we read though Acts, we read of a movement of Jesus followers who were committed to table fellowship and prayer, among other practices. Because they were committed to such practices, they were able to discern the work of the Spirit among them and live a life animated by the Spirit. Such commitments helped them when they had to make decisions such as who should replace Judas (cf. Acts 1:12-26), which seven servants should be appointed to care for the ministry of the widows (cf. Acts 6:1-6), and even when faced with a decision regarding what the gospel requires of Gentile believers (cf. Acts 11). Such commitments drew them immediately into prayer when they realized that the opposition the apostles were facing (cf. Acts 4:23-31). Neither coming together to make a decision or for corporate prayer was the response of democratically human power but the seeking of God at work through his Spirit so that these followers of Jesus might embody the gospel faithfully and continue participating in the mission of God.

A Final Word

Beyond the Sunday gatherings of public worship and fellowship, every local church needs believers who are committed to table fellowship and prayer. That means someone making their home available, inviting a few others over, and taking the lead so that the time is spent purposefully engaged in life and the work of God, where time can be spent in prayer. This is where the Spirit begins cultivating organic change that will undoubtably not only enhance the Sunday gatherings but also lead to organized change as the church discerns how the Spirit is empowering them to live as a faithful yet contextually relevant embodiment of the gospel among the local community.

So what say you?