Category Archives: Leadership

Ministry Leadership: Saying “No!” to the Visitor

If you’re like me and you have children that you are raising or you have already raised children, then you know what it is to vet their friends. You size them up… who are they, who are their parents, what are they like, how do they behave, and so on. You want to make sure your children are not hanging around people who will harm them.

Last year, my wife and I had to make a decision to not allow our son to play with one of the neighborhood children and we told this other child that he wasn’t allowed to play with our son anymore. Why? Because this child was a bully who kept hitting our son. I am sure you would have made the same decision. Why? Because as parents, we’re not going to allow someone to come around our children when they are harmful to our children. We strive to protect our children from harm and sometimes that involves taking very specific and decisive actions.

Our decision to not allow our son to play with the neighborhood boy was not about that boy, it was about our son and his welfare. Yet, sometimes in the church when it comes time for leaders to act for the welfare of the church, there is a hesitancy to do so.

For example, since most churches are small (less than a hundred members), most churches are very interested in retaining anyone who begins visiting their church. But let’s say that in getting to know such visitor, you learn that this person holds some very different views on different issues and is showing him/herself to be very divisive with those views. What should you say or do?

Last year with the Columbia Church of Christ such a visitor started coming to our Sunday morning Bible class and worship gathering. He made it very clear that he disagreed with our gender-inclusive practices, our understanding of God’s grace, with our way of worshiping, and with some of my preaching (surprise, surprise!). He also demonstrated that he wanted to try debating these issues during our Bible class, sort of hijacking the time for his own purpose. So after he was reminded a couple of times that this is not the place for such discussions, as they only cause division, I went to him and explained that this is who are church is and if he is not comfortable with that then there are other churches for him to visit.

I don’t have any regrets about doing so. Not only was he causing disruption among our church, there was also one couple who were new in the faith that I was trying to protect… just like a parent protecting their child.

Part of serving as a leader in the church is protecting the church from those who may cause harm. In an ideal situation, the church will have elders shepherding the church so that this responsibility does not fall to the minister(s) only. Regardless, someone must take very specific and decisive action. Parents don’t really want to tell a neighborhood child that they cannot play with their child anymore. Likewise, Church leaders don’t really want to tell a visitor that they are should look elsewhere. Yet sometimes serving as a leader requires stepping up in a difficult way and saying “No!” to the visitor for the sake of the church.

Church Leadership: Posture and Presence

Years ago I worked as a machinist for Aero Metals, which was a small but growing manufacturing corporation in La Porte, Indiana. The company was locally owned and even though I worked the grave-yard shift from 11:00 PM to 7:00 AM, I met the owner on several occasions when he came in early in the morning. He would stop by to ask how everything was going, if I had any concerns, and other questions like that.

At the time I didn’t have any idea of what this guy was doing. I just figured that he was making sure every person was doing their job since he was the owner and the person who ultimately was writing the paychecks. Twenty years later and with a lot of ministry experience, I have a different perspective.

From the Office to the Floor

You might recall watching the show Undercover Boss which runs on CBS television. The show is about a boss, usually the CEO of a very large and lucrative corporation who puts on a disguise and then does the job among those doing the manual labor. He or She, the head honcho becomes one of the store clerks, the delivery person, the food server, the warehouse personnel, etc…

As the boss does this, he or she engages in real conversation with the employees about the job and about their life. In doing so, these CEOs become aware of the struggles and challenges their employees face, both on the job and in their own personal lives. With awareness, each CEO is able to intelligently act in a way that positively affects their employees personal lives while also affecting positive change for the operation of their business.

By going out on the ground floor, listening and learning to the employees, the boss is able to serve the employees in a way that is win-win for all involved.

Christ-Like Church Leadership

My friend and fellow minister Fred Liggen* defines leadership as listening, learning, and loving. It is essentially what the undercover bosses are doing (just substitute the word “serve” for “love”). But more importantly, it is the sort of leadership we see from Jesus.

Jesus is among the people, in the fields and at the table with them. He meets people where they’re at and engages in conversation with them their. He is listening, learning, and loving them and therefore he is able to lead them. And according to Luke 22:24-27, we can see how Jesus expected that those who would lead in his kingdom would imitate his model of leadership… A dispute also started among them over which of them was to be regarded as the greatest.  So Jesus said to them, “The kings of the Gentiles lord it over them, and those in authority over them are called ‘benefactors.’ Not so with you; instead the one who is greatest among you must become like the youngest, and the leader like the one who serves. For who is greater, the one who is seated at the table, or the one who serves? Is it not the one who is seated at the table? But I am among you as one who serves.”

Thanks to Jesus, my friend Fred, and a few others, I am convinced more than ever that this is what leadership in the church is. Ministers (Pastors) are not CEOs of their church, neither are the elders/shepherds. They both are called to be servants. Their capacity to lead is in the ability to come out of the office or out of the elders room at the building a gather with the members of the church in their homes, in the hospital room or waiting area, at a park, on the golf-course or in the fishing boat, at a restaurant, at a coffee shop, and even at the pub.

It is in these places where the listening, learning, and loving occurs and that is how servants of God can lead. It is about posture and presence among the people and with the people. This is where leadership happens. This is where church leaders are able to acting a way that blesses the individual lives of the church they serve as well as the church as a whole. It works for the Undercover Boss and it will certainly work for the minister or shepherd of the church who comes clothed in nothing but the love and humility of Jesus Christ.

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* I have had a sense of this leadership since following around my friend Ricardo Maia, who is a minister in his homeland of Brazil, as this was Ricardo’s way of leading as a minister. However, it is my friend Fred Liggen, who serves as the minister of the Williamsburg Christian Church, is the first person I know to use the phrase “Listening, Learning, and Loving = Leadership.” Both men are courageous ministers following Jesus as servants in the kingdom of God.

The Conversation Churches Must Engage

As the circumstances of our surrounding culture and community change, so do the issues that face every local church. Often the issues, be it poverty, sexuality, religious pluralism, etc…, remain general enough that a church can ignore them if they wise. But at some point a church will have a visitor come from that new Section 8 housing down the street, having many needs and lives in that new Section 8 housing around the corner. Or that church will learn that the local Muslims are planning to build a Mosque across the street from where the church meets. Or someone in that church will come out of the closet, telling others that they are gay. Suddenly what remained as general issue  become very particular issues that impact the local church in such a way that whatever the response is, it will reshape the identity of the church.

This is called a kairos-moment in the life of the church. The word “kairos” comes from the Greek language and literally means time but not in the chronological sense like the time of day. It refers to an event that is happening among the church which is an opportunity for the church. Regardless of the circumstances of such a kairos-moment, it is an opportunity from God to listen and then walk on mission with God in such a way that the church is transformed. Or, depending on how the church responds, it is an opportunity from God that the church ignores, rejects, etc… which leads to a loss of mission. This is where churches begin to decline, anxiously seeking to go back in time and repeat the past because they fool themselves into believing trying a hundred different versions of the same thing over and over will somehow reap different results.

Responding To A Kairos-Moment

As I said, such kairos-moments are an opportunity for the church. Yet because the particular circumstances of these kairos-moments are difficult issues that raise theological questions and awaken sensitive political triggers, it is tempting and easy for churches just to avoid the issues. Or what happens is that people in the church simply react with a defensive (and highly emotive) response. When this happens, various platitudes, that have more in common with the American left and right than they do with the gospel, are underscored with biblical proof-texts and used as weapons to win the fight. Yet, neither avoiding the issue nor taking a defensive posture will help. By avoiding these kairos-moments, churches are unable to hear God’s voice and by taking a defensive posture, churches are unable to see where God is working.

The first response to such kairos-moments is spiritual-discernment. Such discernment is a conversation that leads to a thoughtful and contextualized response so that the church may continue living on mission with God as faithful followers of Jesus who are animated by the Spirit. It is a conversation that the leaders of the church must have with each other but it is also a conversation that the leaders must have with the rest of the church as well − and the conversation between the leaders and the rest of the church must shape the conversation that the leaders continue having amongst themselves. Failure to have either conversation will again simply result in a lost opportunity, likely rendering the local church as futile among the surrounding culture and community.

Engaging In Spiritual Discernent

I want to suggest two criterions for engaging in spiritual-discernment regarding any particular kairos-moment that I believe will help churches step forward on mission with God These are not the only criterions that could be discussed but they are two that I believe matter immensely.

PROCEED BY GRACE WITH FAITH. The spiritual-discernment necessary here is a process that takes the church into a wilderness so to speak. Sometimes it can feel like walking on ice in the dark… to find the shore, everyone must continue forward but with each step there is a bit of uncertainty as to whether the ice is going to break. It’s easy to become frustrated.

Show each other grace, allow each other to think openly and even say things that may not sound so wise at the moment. And don’t worry about making some mistakes along the way. The journey into the wilderness will come with some mistakes but have faith. Just as God preserved Israel as they journeyed through the wilderness, so will God preserve his people today. What the promise-land looks like will be as surprising as it was for Israel but God will lead the church there. So proceed forward but do so by the grace of God for each other with an abiding faith in God.

ENGAGE SCRIPTURE, TRADITION, & CULTURE TOGETHER. The particular issues that churches face today may share many similarities with the circumstances that other churches find themselves in. Yet they are not exactly the same either, so churches cannot simply juxtapose scripture or Christian tradition down upon any issue and say that what was done before is the church should do now. This locks the church into merely trying to repeat the past rather than living as a present embodiment of the gospel.

The conversation of spiritual-discernment involves bringing scripture, tradition, and culture into conversation with each other. By doing this, churches will discern what their theological praxis (how the church embodies the gospel) must involve for the present circumstances. Formulaically, the conversation of spiritual discernment is: Scripture (S) + Tradition (T) + Culture (C)= Theological Practice (ThP).

S + T + C = ThP

By bringing scripture, tradition, and culture into conversation with each other, the conversation is asking “What does the gospel look like in this?” and “How does the church enact the gospel Jesus lived in this?” The only thing left is for the church to faithfully follow Jesus where the Spirit leads, acting upon what God reveals.

One Final Thought

There is obviously much more to say about bringing scripture, tradition, and culture into conversation with each other that can be said in one blog post. So I hope to say more in the coming months. Nevertheless, this is the sort of conversation that the church had at the Jerusalem Council (Acts 15), has had at different moments throughout history, and must keep having. Yet it’s also a conversation for every local church because that is where the circumstances of culture are encountered in the particular. With that in mind, such conversations must always take place from a posture of listening, that is bathed in prayer and unequivocally faithful to Jesus, who is the Lord, and therefore a faithful embodiment of the gospel Jesus lived and proclaimed.

The Mission of God and Church Growth

Among churches that have recently experienced decline there is an expected anxiousness about the loss of members and the future of the church.* This anxiousness often causes a shift in focus from the mission of God to growth, resulting in churches attempting nearly every new faddish idea that comes along in hopes of reversing the decline. These attempts are fear driven, rather than faith, attempts at self-preservation that only destabilize the health of the church further as every new attempt doesn’t work like it is at that other growing church. All the while, it didn’t work because it didn’t organically emerge from the discernment of where and how God is leading the church. In order for the church to pursue the mission of God, which will bear fruit, this cycle of anxious response must be let go of.

Churches seeking renewal must learn to act in faith, rather than anxious fear. That comes about through discernment of God’s missional calling. As God is sought through prayer, through scripture, and through the community of believers, churches begin to hear where the Spirit is leading them, what that looks like, and what must change about them in order to follow Jesus on mission with God. Then these churches must obey and act upon that leading of the Spirit. When this happens the church changes because the believers who make up that church change as they are being spiritually transformed for renewal in God’s mission. This will impact every aspect of the churches life, from how it worships, to how it fellowships with one another, to how it ministers among it’s community — especially the broken, hurting, and suffering — and to its children whom the church is called to raise as faithful followers of Jesus.

These are churches where faith in Jesus Christ is living and active, as opposed to churches whose only faith is the nostalgic longing for the “good old days.” These are the churches where increase comes because that mustard seed faith is growing spiritually into a gigantic tree. These are the kind of churches, I believe, that God wants to place those who are seeking him among because these are the kind of churches that will nurture the new emerging faith of these seekers with grace and truth, making disciples of Jesus.

So when it comes to numerical growth, it will happen but not by focusing on church growth which is our way of trying to bring about the increase ourselves. Numerical growth will happen when the church trusts in God and learns to live on mission with God through renewal as it discerns the will of God. Along this journey, there will be strategic decisions and actions to make but what those decisions are will be revealed through discernment. In the mean time, keep the focus on God and his mission and growth will come as God gives the increase.

And this − the opportunity to help a church walk on mission with God − is what excites me about serving as a minister of the gospel!

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* This short essay was originally written for a church I am discerning with about serving as a minister with. I have slightly modified what I wrote into this present post.

Thank You All!

The following is the article “Thank You All” that I wrote for the latest and final edition of the Connecting Newsletter, a bi-monthly production of the Columbia Church of Christ (Connecting Newsletter 29, 2014). The article reflects upon our decision as a church to close and the future in light of the gospel story. At some later point I plan to write about the decision and process of closing a Church of Christ as I think this is a decision that more Churches of Christ will face in the coming years but for now…

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Church Logo

For most people, the holidays are a joyous occasion. With Christmas, we have the pleasure of gathering with our family and friends to celebrate life and we are also reminded of the birth of Jesus which is the dawning of hope for the world. Following Christmas, we celebrate New Year’s Day, saying goodbye to the past year while also anticipating with excitement what is to come in the new year. All that is to say that the end is never the end but a new beginning.

An End

As you may already know, the Columbia Church of Christ has made the difficult decisions to close. The following announcement has been posted to our website:

Thank you for your interest in the Columbia Church of Christ. After a year of discerning the direction God has for us as Christians, we have come to the conclusion that he is leading us to merge with other churches where we can continue serving him and his mission. Therefore as a church, the Columbia Church of Christ will close at the end of January 2015. Until then we will continue meeting every Sunday at 10:30 for worship in the Stone House (8775 Cloudleap Ct., Columbia, MD 21045). On Sunday, January 25, 2015 we will have a final celebrative worship gathering as a praise to God for the way he has worked through our church over many years.

Along with that closure comes the end of the Connecting Newsletter which has been produced for twenty-nine years now. So this article marks the final entry into the final newsletter as we enter into the final month for the Columbia Church of Christ.

While there is sadness that comes with this decision, there is reasons for giving thanks. I am thankful for the legacy of this church and I am equally proud to have served as one of her ministers. This congregation has been “a family of grace in Columbia” where the hurting and the struggling have experienced the hope of Christ. This church was also one of the first Churches of Christ to break with tradition regarding the role of women which has help pave the way for a growing number of other Churches of Christ to do the same. This church has been a generous supporter of global missions and local ministries offering help to people in need. So while closure is near, there is good to celebrate.

A New Beginning

Although the closing of the Columbia Church of Christ marks an end, it is not the end. Rather, we are entering into a new beginning. According to the gospel of Jesus Christ, “Death has been swallowed up in victory” (1 Cor 15:54). Therefore there is never an end but always a new beginning which we anticipate.

While the Columbia Church of Christ is closing as an organization, the kingdom of God is not losing anyone. God is leading us forth into other local churches where we can continue serving as disciples of Christ using the gifts that we have received from the Spirit. The earliest Christian community, which resided in Jerusalem, was eventually scattered through persecution (Acts 8:1). At the time, it may have seemed like the end but it wasn’t. God was at work and through the faith of these Christians, the body of Christ continued growing as a movement that is now a global witness to the gospel of Jesus Christ. While we cannot know the particulars of the future, we know that we will continue living as participants in this mission of God.

A Word of Thanks

To all of you, who have continued supporting and praying for the Columbia Church of Christ, thank you! Words will never fully express our appreciation for you but they must do for now. May God bless you as he blesses each and every one of us… “The Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make his face shine on you and be gracious to you; the Lord turn his face toward you and give you peace” (Num 6:24-26)!

When Preaching Fails

One of the books I’m reading for my upcoming class is a book that my teachers, David E. Fitch and Geoff Holsclaw, wrote titled Prodigal Christianity. One of the stories they tell in the book is about watching this street preacher stand for the truth (as he understand it) with boldness as he preaches, only to be rejected by the people he is preaching at. So the authors make this very good point:

“We acknowledge the need for grounding in truth, but when we are too quick to make bold pronouncements, we compromise our ability to witness because we have not truly entered into the cultural world to be with people: to listen to, seek God with, an learn from those with to whom we are witnessing” (p. 53).

Thanks to another preacher, John Dobbs, here’s a video of some other preacher that helps illustrate their point:

Similar to Fitch and Holsclaw, my friend Fred Liggen says that leadership requires listening, learning, and loving. He’s right. They’re right. Before were can lead others some place, which is what preaching seeks to do, we must listen to them, learn from them, and love them.

For Ministers: Serving With An Assumption of Grace

Every Christian is a human, including elders and ministers. All are redeemed but all are still being refined and made into the image of Christ.

With that being said, let’s acknowledge that there are some very bad elders just as there are some very bad ministers. I’m talking about people who are very unethical and even malicious in their treatment of others. However, in my experience, this is the exception rather than the norm.

In fact, in my experience, most church leaders mean well and intend to do well. However, like everyone else, every church leader has faults and weaknesses too. That includes me too. Realizing this has become very freeing because it has allowed me to forgive and move on. I’ve learned to minister with an assumption of grace towards others, including other church leaders. That is, I don’t expect other church leaders (e.g., elders) to be Jesus, I expect them to be themselves and I have already forgiven them for that. I hope they will forgive me for being myself too.

This is freeing as it allows me, as a minister and church leader, to serve my church with grace because I know that I am in as much need of grace as they are. Yes… our churches will disappoint us from time to time. But as difficult as the disappoint will be at times, learning to minister with an assumption of grace will allow us to serve with joy even in the difficult moments.

May the grace of God in Christ and in the power of the Spirit be upon us all!