Category Archives: Churches of Christ

Thank You All!

The following is the article “Thank You All” that I wrote for the latest and final edition of the Connecting Newsletter, a bi-monthly production of the Columbia Church of Christ (Connecting Newsletter 29, 2014). The article reflects upon our decision as a church to close and the future in light of the gospel story. At some later point I plan to write about the decision and process of closing a Church of Christ as I think this is a decision that more Churches of Christ will face in the coming years but for now…

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Church Logo

For most people, the holidays are a joyous occasion. With Christmas, we have the pleasure of gathering with our family and friends to celebrate life and we are also reminded of the birth of Jesus which is the dawning of hope for the world. Following Christmas, we celebrate New Year’s Day, saying goodbye to the past year while also anticipating with excitement what is to come in the new year. All that is to say that the end is never the end but a new beginning.

An End

As you may already know, the Columbia Church of Christ has made the difficult decisions to close. The following announcement has been posted to our website:

Thank you for your interest in the Columbia Church of Christ. After a year of discerning the direction God has for us as Christians, we have come to the conclusion that he is leading us to merge with other churches where we can continue serving him and his mission. Therefore as a church, the Columbia Church of Christ will close at the end of January 2015. Until then we will continue meeting every Sunday at 10:30 for worship in the Stone House (8775 Cloudleap Ct., Columbia, MD 21045). On Sunday, January 25, 2015 we will have a final celebrative worship gathering as a praise to God for the way he has worked through our church over many years.

Along with that closure comes the end of the Connecting Newsletter which has been produced for twenty-nine years now. So this article marks the final entry into the final newsletter as we enter into the final month for the Columbia Church of Christ.

While there is sadness that comes with this decision, there is reasons for giving thanks. I am thankful for the legacy of this church and I am equally proud to have served as one of her ministers. This congregation has been “a family of grace in Columbia” where the hurting and the struggling have experienced the hope of Christ. This church was also one of the first Churches of Christ to break with tradition regarding the role of women which has help pave the way for a growing number of other Churches of Christ to do the same. This church has been a generous supporter of global missions and local ministries offering help to people in need. So while closure is near, there is good to celebrate.

A New Beginning

Although the closing of the Columbia Church of Christ marks an end, it is not the end. Rather, we are entering into a new beginning. According to the gospel of Jesus Christ, “Death has been swallowed up in victory” (1 Cor 15:54). Therefore there is never an end but always a new beginning which we anticipate.

While the Columbia Church of Christ is closing as an organization, the kingdom of God is not losing anyone. God is leading us forth into other local churches where we can continue serving as disciples of Christ using the gifts that we have received from the Spirit. The earliest Christian community, which resided in Jerusalem, was eventually scattered through persecution (Acts 8:1). At the time, it may have seemed like the end but it wasn’t. God was at work and through the faith of these Christians, the body of Christ continued growing as a movement that is now a global witness to the gospel of Jesus Christ. While we cannot know the particulars of the future, we know that we will continue living as participants in this mission of God.

A Word of Thanks

To all of you, who have continued supporting and praying for the Columbia Church of Christ, thank you! Words will never fully express our appreciation for you but they must do for now. May God bless you as he blesses each and every one of us… “The Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make his face shine on you and be gracious to you; the Lord turn his face toward you and give you peace” (Num 6:24-26)!

Testing the Gospel Among Us.

Nothing like a video announcement of a Church of Christ taking on a female preaching intern to stir up the waters. The video was available here but has been made private. In sum, the Fourth Avenue Church of Christ in Franklin, Tennessee has recognized the gifting and talents for preaching that God is developing in Lipscomb University student Lauren King. By doing so, the Fourth Avenue Church is provided Ms. King an opportunity to further develop her calling under the mentoring of Senior Minister Patrick Mead.

The Bigger Issue…

In case you’re wondering and for the sake of putting my own cards on the table, I applaud the opportunity that the Fourth Avenue Church is giving to this young preacher-in-training. If you are interested in my reasons for such applause, you can read my post titled “Neither Male Nor Female (Part 4)” which will also provide you with links to parts 1-3. What I am interested in is how churches and Christians respond to such news which I think has a lot more to say about whether we truly understand the gospel of Jesus Christ than whether we agree or disagree with the decision made by the Fourth Avenue Church.

If you’ve read this far then you’re probably familiar with the subsequent conversation that has taken place. As expected, some of the conversation is necessary and helpful but certainly some of the conversation has been unnecessary and the least bit helpful. For an example, just read this post and the comments that follow on Brotherhood News which is but one example of the divisive comments I have read.

It matters not whether we agree or disagree with the decision of the Fourth Avenue church. When our response to a decision that other churches and Christians make descends into divisive accusations, we may justify it all we want under the guise of pursuing sound doctrine but in the end it shows a failure of the gospel at work among us. That is to say, the bigger issue here is about whether or not we truly grasp the gospel of Jesus Christ. The decision made by the Fourth Avenue Church has simply provided an occasion for testing how well the Churches of Christ are embodying the gospel.

Among the Corinthian Church…

Here is what I mean… Take the Corinthian church in scripture as an example. That was a church where division was but one of several significant problems. The Corinthian Christians were allowing baptism to divide them (1 Cor 1:10-17) and the divisive spirit among them play out in several ways but perhaps none bigger than among their worship gatherings. That is why chapters 11-14 of First Corinthians are addressing matters pertaining to the corporate worship.

Part of Paul’s strategy was to remind the Corinthians of the Lord’s Supper they eat together as a church. This meal, which takes place by the invitation of Jesus at his table, is the church’s way of continued participation in the gospel story which has reconciled both Jew and Gentile as one unified body in Christ. Because it is the continued participation in the gospel story, when Christian act divisively towards each other they show their failure in grasping the gospel itself.

But wait a minute… what about when a church or Christian does something that we believe is a violation of biblical teaching? After all, that is what the subsequent conversation about the Fourth Avenue Church’s decision is about. Those who disagree with the decision believe that this church is violating biblical teaching. So should those who disagree not voice their concern?

Of course, they should. There’s nothing wrong with voicing disagreement. But when that disagreement turns towards inflammatory accusations that slander fellow Christians and churches, that voice becomes divisive and here is why. For all the disagreements that existed among the Christians in Corinth, Paul never once tells them that they must agree with one another. Unity is not uniformity! Instead, in one of the most famous chapters in the Bible, chapter 13, Paul points the church back to the practice of love. Then he goes on to instruct them by saying, “Pursue love and be eager for the spiritual gifts…” (1 Cor 14:1).

Think about it. As Christians, we may be right on any number of different issues but if we don’t love those with whom we disagree then we are wrong. Unity is loving even those we disagree with. It’s that simple. And that includes how we speak towards each other and what we do with our knowledge (cf. 1 Cor 13:1-3).

So In Closing…

As Christians, we are free to disagree but we are not free to use our disagreement as an occasion for maligning other Christians, churches, and Christian organizations that differ from us. Until we learn how to season our responses on controversial matters with love, we show our own failure in grasping the gospel of Jesus Christ. So it appears past due we reconsider what it means to speak and fathom knowledge with love. Further more, for those who still think that the Fourth Avenue Church is wrong… so be it. But remember, for all the problems that the Corinthian church had, Paul still thought of them and addressed them as the church!

Christianity In An Age of Religious Pluralism

Perhaps you’ve heard of Duck Dynasty. I’m a fan. I’ve not seen every episode but I’ve seen a bunch. Besides the humorous adventures of the Robertson clan, the fact that I minister with a Church of Christ and that there’s enough red-neck still in me keeps my interest. One of the great values of the show is that every episode ends with the family eating and praying together, which is a great example to set.* 

Our Context Matters…

The show has established a platform for the family to express their Christian faith and Phil Robertson has seemingly taken advantage of this platform the most. On a few occasions Phil has made some comments which might not raise any concern in his own context but certainly do elsewhere. Having said that, I don’t want to spend any more time criticizing Phil or discussing his past remarks.

I mention Phil Robertson in order to make an observation about a difference between his context and the context of many other Christians, including those among the Churches of Christ. The Robertson’s live near West Monroe, Louisiana where those who affiliate with a Christian church make up roughly 90% of the population.  Compare that to Columbia, Maryland, where 56% of the people do not claim any church affiliation. On top of that, the last time I checked, my children attend school with children from thirty-nine different nationalities. As you might imagine, along with those thirty-nine different nationalities comes a plurality of religions and assortment of values that sometimes differ drastically from the values held by many Christians.

All that is to say that while I appreciate the public stance Phil Robertson is willing to make for what he believes, his example is not a model for every Christian. The response Phil Robertson takes is one that is shaped by his own cultural context. Yet more and more Christians find themselves living in an urban to suburban context that is very different, one where religious pluralism is a reality that requires a different approach.

Apologetics As A Way of Life…

When taking a stance for Christ, one of the frequently cited verses is 1 Peter 3:15. In this passage, the apostle Peter says, “But set Christ apart as Lord in your hearts and always be ready to give an answer to anyone who asks about the hope you possess” (NET). For many Christians, Peter is talking about defending the existence of God or the resurrection of Christ. That’s why this passage is a favorite proof-texts among the enterprise of Christian apologetics. I’m all for providing good intellectual answers for those who struggle with Christian belief but what Peter is talking about in this passage is apologetics as a way of life. That is, to set Christ apart (sanctify) in our hearts is about making the way of life that Christ teaches our way of life. A quick read of the entire letter of 1 Peter should make this abundantly clear. 

Embracing apologetics as a way of life involves at least two steps:

  1. The first step in taking a public stance for our faith involves the way in which we set Christ apart in our hearts as Lord. We make sure that our life reflects the life of Jesus. What we say and do reveals our true values and when we profess Christ as Lord but exemplify a different set of values than those which Jesus embodied while on earth, we nullify our witness. One of the values Jesus lived by while here on earth involved the formation of relationships with other people. When we form relationships with others our Christ-likeness becomes a testimony that gives us a credible basis for proclaiming Jesus.
  2. Because we regard Jesus as Lord, the way in which we give an answer for the hope we have matters too. We don’t have an argument to win, just the good news of God’s victory in Christ to bear witness of. As David E. Fitch and Geoff Holsclaw say, “Surely such claim for the supremacy of Christ pits us against other religions and other ways to God. But the conviction that Jesus is Lord actually does the opposite: it frees us from coercion and control. It is Jesus that is Lord, not us. We do not need to land a knockout punch to win an argument against another religion. We are witnesses! We do not need to be prosecuting attorneys on behalf of Jesus. We are witnesses!” (Prodigal Christianity, 158).

As believers and followers of Jesus, we are called to live as his witnesses. In an age of increased religious pluralism, we must become more intentional about taking a stance for the gospel of Jesus Christ. Such intentionality includes boldness but let’s not confuse boldness with brashness. Our bold witness of Jesus must reflect the life of Jesus if we are to truly set Christ apart in our hearts as Lord.

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* Except for a few stylistic changes, this exact article was originally published in Connecting 29 (December 3, 2014), a biweekly publication of the Columbia Church of Christ, and has been reformatted for this blog.

Holy Lovers

Last Sunday I preached from First Peter about living into the hope we have. The issue is really about the holiness of the church. The apostle Peter instructs us saying, “but, like the Holy One who call you, become holy yourselves in all of your conduct, for it is written, ‘You shall be holy, because I am holy’” (1 Pet 1:15-16).*

Holy Is?

Like many common religious terms, the word holy has just enough familiarity that we think we understand it. Consequently, it’s tempting to never inquire any further about what becoming holy means.

That opens the door for a lot of misunderstanding. In the biblical narrative holiness is not merely an abstract concept. Holiness, or the lack of, is displayed through concrete actions. Due likely to Puritan influence, the first thing that usually comes to mind for us when it pertains to holiness is avoiding the “works of the flesh” (Gal 5:19-21). That’s certainly a part of living holy lives but this is much more involved in becoming holy.

Becoming Holy Lovers

Peter’s instruction to become holy includes the quote “You shall be holy, because I am holy” which comes from Leviticus 19:2. In that context God is calling Israel to regard themselves as separate from the rest of the nations and giving them instructions for how they are to live as the distinguished (consecrated) people of God who are separate from the nations. The first thing we need to realize is that our identity is the church. We are the body and bride of Christ… who happen to live in America, not Americans who happen to go to church.

Once we understand our identity as the church, we must live like it. Becoming holy is to become like God, who is holy. Again, this is not an abstract concept. The holiness of God is displayed through his actions. Chief among these actions is God’s redemptive pursuit of his creation, motivated by his love for creation and his desire to see justice and righteousness done among creation. This is why God gives Israel the Law after redeeming them from Egypt.

Therefore, as Peter insists that we are called to obedience he points us back to God’s redemptive act in Christ. Peter wants us to understand that holy living involves reflecting the redemptive character of God. So Peter insists that we, who are called to become holy, must embrace a “mutual love” as we “love one another” (1 Pet 1:22).

The Contrast

The instruction to become holy is an expansive call but we should not forget that it involves loving one another as brothers and sisters in Christ. Just as the love of God is displayed in the self-giving act of sacrificing his Son for our sake, so we must love one another through self-giving acts. Such actions include the ability to remain patient with each other, forgive each other, serve one another as needs arise, and so forth. This is why I titled this article Holy Lovers.

This may not seem like a big deal but it is. I think of all the stories I’ve heard and even encountered at times that involve stressful work-place drama. I’m talking about sordid accounts of gossip, slander, gamesmanship, politics, and other deeds that make for misery. Now imagine a society where instead of stepping over others, people lower themselves to lift each other up with grace and mercy. It’s a holy society and that’s what we’re called to become. The contrast is huge!

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* This article was originally published in Connecting 29 (November 12, 2014), a biweekly publication of the Columbia Church of Christ, and has been reformatted for this blog.

Agents of Grace

One of the books I’m reading through is Captive to the Word of God by Miroslav Volf. The author offers reflects on how scripture forms the theological mind so that belief and practice remain conjoined and interwoven. The idea is that what we believe is evident in our practices and therefore our practices declare what we believe.*

On Belief and Practice

The relationship between belief and practice has everything to do with our understanding of the grace of God. Volf picks up on this when he says, “Inscribed in the very heart of God’s grace is the rule that we can be its recipients only if we do not resist being made into its agents. In a precisely defined way that guards the distinction between God and human beings, human beings themselves are made participants in the divine activity and therefore are inspired, empowered, and obligated to imitate it.” (p. 51-52). So when we reflect upon the grace of God and how we become agents of this grace, we must ask two important questions: 1) What sort of life has God redeemed us from? 2) What sort of life has God redeemed us for?

By asking these two questions we are saying that the grace of God is both a salvation from and salvation to something. Therefore, in surrendering our will so that God may make us into an agent of his grace, we are letting go of an old way of life while simultaneously embracing a new way of life. The old life is the myriad of ways that have pulled us away from our created intent, while the new way of life is the remaking of our created intent which we receive from and learn how to live in Jesus Christ. In Colossians Paul says, “Therefore, if you have been raised with Christ, keep seeking the things above… …since you have put off the old man with its practice and have been clothed with the new man that is being renewed in the knowledge according to the image of the one who created it” (3:1, 9-10, NET).

Beliefs and practices belong together. Our believing commits us to practicing and our particular beliefs commit us to particular practices which we cannot neglect if we truly believe. This isn’t to say that we will perfectly practice our beliefs or never find ourselves neglecting certain aspects of our practices but to say that if we believe, it will become evident in the way we live. For those who have trouble reconciling the teaching of Paul with the teaching of James (cf. Js. 2:17-19), it should be evident that they both are really on the same page.

Participants of the Story

By learning to practice our beliefs, putting away our old self and putting on the new self, we allow God to remake us as agents of grace. That is to say, as we have received the grace of God, so we become conduits of that grace in the way we live. This is our way of life and it includes the ways in which we cease living as and the ways in which we embrace, learning to live as Christ. It’s the way of Christ.

As I reflect on this, I have one final thought. Throughout scripture we read the stories of people like Abraham, Moses, Ruth, Hannah, David, Daniel, Mary, John the Baptist, Peter, Paul, etc… In these stories we see how God worked, accomplishing the seemingly impossible because of their enormous faith. Such stories challenge and inspire us as they should. We read these stories as part of the biblical narrative, joining the story. Yet we must realize that our participation in the story may involve the seemingly impossible tasks of our ancestors, our participation will always involve letting go of the old and putting on the new.

Our call is one that emanates from the grace of God and therefore is one that embraces the grace of God, turning from and turning to, becoming agents of that grace!

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* This article was originally published in Connecting 29 (October 29, 2014), a biweekly publication of the Columbia Church of Christ, and has been reformatted for this blog.

Because Jesus Says “Come!”

I don’t know what it would be like to walk on water as Peter did but according to the story, doing so led Peter to Jesus. Well, that was until he became afraid and took his eyes off of Jesus. That’s when he stopped walking on the water and began sinking. You can read the entire story of Peter in Matthew 14:22-36.*

Stepping Into The Chaos

Most people who remember the story do so thinking of Jesus. But we shouldn’t forget about Peter because in many ways we are Peter. We here Jesus say “Come!” and that means we must step out of the boat and walk. But stepping out of the boat is scary business because to do so means stepping out and on to the sea, the great symbol of chaos throughout the Bible.

Chaos is difficult and frankly, nobody wants it or needs it. Not I. Not you. The boat is a much safer place. Though it may be surrounded by chaos as it sails on the sea, staying in the boat gives us the illusion that everything is ok and will be ok. Whatever danger staying in the boat may pose, it seems manageable. Faith is unnecessary, we just need to keep sailing until we reach the shore. The only problem is that Jesus isn’t standing on the shore . . . he’s walking on the water, telling us to get out of the boat and come to him.

Peter did the right thing when Jesus called. He got out of the boat and with his eyes fixed on Jesus, he began walking on the water towards Jesus. What got Peter into trouble was taking his eyes off Jesus. That’s when he began sinking. Yet even in sinking, he still did the right thing. That is, he still reached out to Jesus.

Perhaps we would do the same when we feel ourselves sinking in the chaos. But I also know that the boat remains a few yards away. So we might just try swimming back to the boat, thinking that if we can just get back to the boat and get control of the situation ourselves − or at least get things back to manageable situation − then everything will be okay.

It won’t! Jesus isn’t there. Jesus is out on the water bidding us to come join him. Peter did. Even cowering in faith, he reached out to Jesus. And Jesus saved him and sent on to become a founding apostolic witness for this kingdom of God movement that has now gone global.

But Peter never got back into that boat!

Eyes Upon Jesus!

Of course, I’m not really talking about a boat! I’m talking about the church. Your church. My church. Our church.

Jesus is calling but to step on the water and go to him, we have to step out of the boat and that is full of risk. Yet the boat, as we know it, appears safe. It’s surely more convenient. It appears more manageable, as we know how to row this boat because we’ve done it for some time. And if we step out on to the water and find ourselves sinking in the chaos, which seems normal, the temptation is to swim back to the boat, grabbing for a life-preserver, a boat oar, or anything else to feel safe again. But doing so loses focus on Jesus because he isn’t sitting in the boat . . . he’s out walking on the water.

So keep our eyes focused on Jesus and we’ll walk on water, joining Jesus and following him in this Kingdom journey. Just like Peter did . . . who never got back in that boat!

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* This article was originally published in Connecting 29 (October 15, 2014), a biweekly publication of the Columbia Church of Christ, and has been reformatted for this blog.

Blessing The Children

Yesterday the Columbia Church of Christ had our blessing of the children. Besides singing songs and reading scripture about the abundant blessings of God, the message was about the role parents and the church plays in raising children as faithful followers of Jesus. At the end of the message, the parents brought their children and committed to raising them as followers of Jesus, with the church lifting each child up in a prayer of blessing. After blessing our children, we shared in the Lord’s Supper together.

The following was part of the prayer of blessing offered for our children:

As the family of God, a congregation of whom Jesus is the head…We ask for you God, our Father in heaven to bless these children…

Lord, we praise you for the life of these children and ask you to surround everyone of them with your blessing, that they each may know your love and may be protected from all evil, knowing your goodness all the days of their lives.

Lord, we ask that you bless the parents of these children, giving them the grace to love and care for their children with patience and faith. As they stand before us as a profession of their commitment to teach their children to be followers of your Son, Jesus, may your Spirit grant them wisdom and guidance to live as Jesus, setting an example of what it means to be a Christian!

And Lord, as we give these Bibles to the newest born children among us, we pray that as they grow up, they will receive the scriptures as your word, shaping them and becoming their story… our story…your story, Lord! Amen!*

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* Adapted from an Anglican prayer of blessing for children.