Thank You All!

The following is the article “Thank You All” that I wrote for the latest and final edition of the Connecting Newsletter, a bi-monthly production of the Columbia Church of Christ (Connecting Newsletter 29, 2014). The article reflects upon our decision as a church to close and the future in light of the gospel story. At some later point I plan to write about the decision and process of closing a Church of Christ as I think this is a decision that more Churches of Christ will face in the coming years but for now…

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Church Logo

For most people, the holidays are a joyous occasion. With Christmas, we have the pleasure of gathering with our family and friends to celebrate life and we are also reminded of the birth of Jesus which is the dawning of hope for the world. Following Christmas, we celebrate New Year’s Day, saying goodbye to the past year while also anticipating with excitement what is to come in the new year. All that is to say that the end is never the end but a new beginning.

An End

As you may already know, the Columbia Church of Christ has made the difficult decisions to close. The following announcement has been posted to our website:

Thank you for your interest in the Columbia Church of Christ. After a year of discerning the direction God has for us as Christians, we have come to the conclusion that he is leading us to merge with other churches where we can continue serving him and his mission. Therefore as a church, the Columbia Church of Christ will close at the end of January 2015. Until then we will continue meeting every Sunday at 10:30 for worship in the Stone House (8775 Cloudleap Ct., Columbia, MD 21045). On Sunday, January 25, 2015 we will have a final celebrative worship gathering as a praise to God for the way he has worked through our church over many years.

Along with that closure comes the end of the Connecting Newsletter which has been produced for twenty-nine years now. So this article marks the final entry into the final newsletter as we enter into the final month for the Columbia Church of Christ.

While there is sadness that comes with this decision, there is reasons for giving thanks. I am thankful for the legacy of this church and I am equally proud to have served as one of her ministers. This congregation has been “a family of grace in Columbia” where the hurting and the struggling have experienced the hope of Christ. This church was also one of the first Churches of Christ to break with tradition regarding the role of women which has help pave the way for a growing number of other Churches of Christ to do the same. This church has been a generous supporter of global missions and local ministries offering help to people in need. So while closure is near, there is good to celebrate.

A New Beginning

Although the closing of the Columbia Church of Christ marks an end, it is not the end. Rather, we are entering into a new beginning. According to the gospel of Jesus Christ, “Death has been swallowed up in victory” (1 Cor 15:54). Therefore there is never an end but always a new beginning which we anticipate.

While the Columbia Church of Christ is closing as an organization, the kingdom of God is not losing anyone. God is leading us forth into other local churches where we can continue serving as disciples of Christ using the gifts that we have received from the Spirit. The earliest Christian community, which resided in Jerusalem, was eventually scattered through persecution (Acts 8:1). At the time, it may have seemed like the end but it wasn’t. God was at work and through the faith of these Christians, the body of Christ continued growing as a movement that is now a global witness to the gospel of Jesus Christ. While we cannot know the particulars of the future, we know that we will continue living as participants in this mission of God.

A Word of Thanks

To all of you, who have continued supporting and praying for the Columbia Church of Christ, thank you! Words will never fully express our appreciation for you but they must do for now. May God bless you as he blesses each and every one of us… “The Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make his face shine on you and be gracious to you; the Lord turn his face toward you and give you peace” (Num 6:24-26)!

Evading Jesus: Christians and Violence

Brian Zahnd recently wrote a blog post titled You Cannot Be Christian and Support Torture that went viral within the evangelical sub-culture. The post generated a lot of conversation, including a lot of disagreement. That’s not surprising but it is saddening. If I didn’t know any better, from the way some Christians defend the use of torture and violence I just might conclude that Jesus is a violent warrior who makes right by violent might.

Of course, that’s ludicrous! Jesus had the opportunity to lead a violent revolution but chose instead to humbly die on the cross at the hands of his enemies rather than killing his enemies. This is how Jesus loves even his enemies and Christians know this. Christians know that Jesus teaches us to love our enemies (cf. Matt 5:44). Christians know that Jesus calls us to follow him by picking up our own cross (cf. Mk 8:34). In fact, Christians know that the teaching and example of Jesus does not include violence.

Even if it can be argued that there are times where some level of violence is permissible (cf. Doctrine of Just-War), there is nothing virtuous about violence.  Violence is nothing for a Christian to champion. But that doesn’t matter for some.

In order to negate the teaching and example of Jesus in the canonical Gospels, some Christians are now claiming that Jesus employed violence in the Old Testament as the second member of the Trinity.

That’s the claim I am reading among some commenters on various blogs and Facebook thread. But plain and simple, this is grasping at straws. There are at least two problems with such an argument:

  1. Suggesting that Jesus used violence in the Old Testament as the second-member of the Triune Godhead broaches upon the heresy of decetism. While such a claim doesn’t actually deny the physical existence of Jesus’s life, it negates the physical life he lived, which was both a non-violent and an exemplary life, by appealing to his divinity in order to justify violence as part of the Christian life. This claim, of course, is made while ignoring the fact that while Jesus is the eternal Son of God, it is only in his flesh as God Incarnate that he reveals the fullness of the invisible God (cf. Col 1:15, 19).
  2. Suggesting that Jesus used violence in the Old Testament as the second-member of the Triune Godhead employs an anachronistic reading of the Bible. The Bible has a directional flow to it’s narrative that such a claim ignores by imposing Christian theological claims upon the earlier part of the narrative while ignoring the claims made in the later part of the narrative. That is, those making such a claim impose Trinitarian theology upon the Old Testament in order to make Jesus violent while setting aside the Trinitarian revelation of God in Jesus Christ which culminates with the cross rather than a sword.

Such carelessness on the part of some Christians, including some who have a theological education, clearly reveals just how much the tail is wagging the dog. In the end it just reveals how much Christianity in America is willing to ignore the elephant in the room… evading the Jesus whom we are called to follow just so that we can continue legitimizing the American way, which includes violence.

Maybe we need to learn from Jesus again…

“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called the children of God.” - Jesus, Matt 5:9

Testing the Gospel Among Us.

Nothing like a video announcement of a Church of Christ taking on a female preaching intern to stir up the waters. The video was available here but has been made private. In sum, the Fourth Avenue Church of Christ in Franklin, Tennessee has recognized the gifting and talents for preaching that God is developing in Lipscomb University student Lauren King. By doing so, the Fourth Avenue Church is provided Ms. King an opportunity to further develop her calling under the mentoring of Senior Minister Patrick Mead.

The Bigger Issue…

In case you’re wondering and for the sake of putting my own cards on the table, I applaud the opportunity that the Fourth Avenue Church is giving to this young preacher-in-training. If you are interested in my reasons for such applause, you can read my post titled “Neither Male Nor Female (Part 4)” which will also provide you with links to parts 1-3. What I am interested in is how churches and Christians respond to such news which I think has a lot more to say about whether we truly understand the gospel of Jesus Christ than whether we agree or disagree with the decision made by the Fourth Avenue Church.

If you’ve read this far then you’re probably familiar with the subsequent conversation that has taken place. As expected, some of the conversation is necessary and helpful but certainly some of the conversation has been unnecessary and the least bit helpful. For an example, just read this post and the comments that follow on Brotherhood News which is but one example of the divisive comments I have read.

It matters not whether we agree or disagree with the decision of the Fourth Avenue church. When our response to a decision that other churches and Christians make descends into divisive accusations, we may justify it all we want under the guise of pursuing sound doctrine but in the end it shows a failure of the gospel at work among us. That is to say, the bigger issue here is about whether or not we truly grasp the gospel of Jesus Christ. The decision made by the Fourth Avenue Church has simply provided an occasion for testing how well the Churches of Christ are embodying the gospel.

Among the Corinthian Church…

Here is what I mean… Take the Corinthian church in scripture as an example. That was a church where division was but one of several significant problems. The Corinthian Christians were allowing baptism to divide them (1 Cor 1:10-17) and the divisive spirit among them play out in several ways but perhaps none bigger than among their worship gatherings. That is why chapters 11-14 of First Corinthians are addressing matters pertaining to the corporate worship.

Part of Paul’s strategy was to remind the Corinthians of the Lord’s Supper they eat together as a church. This meal, which takes place by the invitation of Jesus at his table, is the church’s way of continued participation in the gospel story which has reconciled both Jew and Gentile as one unified body in Christ. Because it is the continued participation in the gospel story, when Christian act divisively towards each other they show their failure in grasping the gospel itself.

But wait a minute… what about when a church or Christian does something that we believe is a violation of biblical teaching? After all, that is what the subsequent conversation about the Fourth Avenue Church’s decision is about. Those who disagree with the decision believe that this church is violating biblical teaching. So should those who disagree not voice their concern?

Of course, they should. There’s nothing wrong with voicing disagreement. But when that disagreement turns towards inflammatory accusations that slander fellow Christians and churches, that voice becomes divisive and here is why. For all the disagreements that existed among the Christians in Corinth, Paul never once tells them that they must agree with one another. Unity is not uniformity! Instead, in one of the most famous chapters in the Bible, chapter 13, Paul points the church back to the practice of love. Then he goes on to instruct them by saying, “Pursue love and be eager for the spiritual gifts…” (1 Cor 14:1).

Think about it. As Christians, we may be right on any number of different issues but if we don’t love those with whom we disagree then we are wrong. Unity is loving even those we disagree with. It’s that simple. And that includes how we speak towards each other and what we do with our knowledge (cf. 1 Cor 13:1-3).

So In Closing…

As Christians, we are free to disagree but we are not free to use our disagreement as an occasion for maligning other Christians, churches, and Christian organizations that differ from us. Until we learn how to season our responses on controversial matters with love, we show our own failure in grasping the gospel of Jesus Christ. So it appears past due we reconsider what it means to speak and fathom knowledge with love. Further more, for those who still think that the Fourth Avenue Church is wrong… so be it. But remember, for all the problems that the Corinthian church had, Paul still thought of them and addressed them as the church!

Christianity In An Age of Religious Pluralism

Perhaps you’ve heard of Duck Dynasty. I’m a fan. I’ve not seen every episode but I’ve seen a bunch. Besides the humorous adventures of the Robertson clan, the fact that I minister with a Church of Christ and that there’s enough red-neck still in me keeps my interest. One of the great values of the show is that every episode ends with the family eating and praying together, which is a great example to set.* 

Our Context Matters…

The show has established a platform for the family to express their Christian faith and Phil Robertson has seemingly taken advantage of this platform the most. On a few occasions Phil has made some comments which might not raise any concern in his own context but certainly do elsewhere. Having said that, I don’t want to spend any more time criticizing Phil or discussing his past remarks.

I mention Phil Robertson in order to make an observation about a difference between his context and the context of many other Christians, including those among the Churches of Christ. The Robertson’s live near West Monroe, Louisiana where those who affiliate with a Christian church make up roughly 90% of the population.  Compare that to Columbia, Maryland, where 56% of the people do not claim any church affiliation. On top of that, the last time I checked, my children attend school with children from thirty-nine different nationalities. As you might imagine, along with those thirty-nine different nationalities comes a plurality of religions and assortment of values that sometimes differ drastically from the values held by many Christians.

All that is to say that while I appreciate the public stance Phil Robertson is willing to make for what he believes, his example is not a model for every Christian. The response Phil Robertson takes is one that is shaped by his own cultural context. Yet more and more Christians find themselves living in an urban to suburban context that is very different, one where religious pluralism is a reality that requires a different approach.

Apologetics As A Way of Life…

When taking a stance for Christ, one of the frequently cited verses is 1 Peter 3:15. In this passage, the apostle Peter says, “But set Christ apart as Lord in your hearts and always be ready to give an answer to anyone who asks about the hope you possess” (NET). For many Christians, Peter is talking about defending the existence of God or the resurrection of Christ. That’s why this passage is a favorite proof-texts among the enterprise of Christian apologetics. I’m all for providing good intellectual answers for those who struggle with Christian belief but what Peter is talking about in this passage is apologetics as a way of life. That is, to set Christ apart (sanctify) in our hearts is about making the way of life that Christ teaches our way of life. A quick read of the entire letter of 1 Peter should make this abundantly clear. 

Embracing apologetics as a way of life involves at least two steps:

  1. The first step in taking a public stance for our faith involves the way in which we set Christ apart in our hearts as Lord. We make sure that our life reflects the life of Jesus. What we say and do reveals our true values and when we profess Christ as Lord but exemplify a different set of values than those which Jesus embodied while on earth, we nullify our witness. One of the values Jesus lived by while here on earth involved the formation of relationships with other people. When we form relationships with others our Christ-likeness becomes a testimony that gives us a credible basis for proclaiming Jesus.
  2. Because we regard Jesus as Lord, the way in which we give an answer for the hope we have matters too. We don’t have an argument to win, just the good news of God’s victory in Christ to bear witness of. As David E. Fitch and Geoff Holsclaw say, “Surely such claim for the supremacy of Christ pits us against other religions and other ways to God. But the conviction that Jesus is Lord actually does the opposite: it frees us from coercion and control. It is Jesus that is Lord, not us. We do not need to land a knockout punch to win an argument against another religion. We are witnesses! We do not need to be prosecuting attorneys on behalf of Jesus. We are witnesses!” (Prodigal Christianity, 158).

As believers and followers of Jesus, we are called to live as his witnesses. In an age of increased religious pluralism, we must become more intentional about taking a stance for the gospel of Jesus Christ. Such intentionality includes boldness but let’s not confuse boldness with brashness. Our bold witness of Jesus must reflect the life of Jesus if we are to truly set Christ apart in our hearts as Lord.

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* Except for a few stylistic changes, this exact article was originally published in Connecting 29 (December 3, 2014), a biweekly publication of the Columbia Church of Christ, and has been reformatted for this blog.

Engaging In A Culture War

Whatever you think about the current state of American culture, it’s clear that Christianity no longer has the influence it once had. There isn’t any use in becoming upset about it or complaining about it because that will change very little, if anything. Instead consider asking how should Christians posture themselves amidst a culture that appears less than receptive to Christianity?

The Courage Not To Fight Back!

Perhaps you’ve seen the movie 42 about the story of Jackie Robinson. There’s a scene in the movie where Branch Rickey, the owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers is talking with to Jackie Robinson about the challenge his is going to face…

“People aren’t going to like this. They’re gonna do anything to get you to react. Echo a curse with a curse, and they’ll only hear yours. Follow a blow with a blow and they’ll say the Negro lost his temper. You’re enemy will be out in force and you cannot meet him on his own low ground. We win with hitting, running, fielding… only that. We win if the world is convinced of two things: that you are a fine gentleman and a great baseball player.”

Robinson asks, “You want a player who doesn’t have the guts to fight back?”

So Rickey says, “No. I want a player who’s got the guts not to fight back.”

Perhaps the best response Christians can have towards the current changing American culture is having the courage not to fight back!

Christians Have Lost Their Temper?

Every year as Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day approaches, there are some Christians who insist upon engaging in a culture war over the greeting “Merry Christmas.” By insisting upon the phrase “Merry Christmas” as opposed to “Happy Holidays” or “Seasons Greetings,” they think that the society at large will remember the “reason for the season.” They call for Christians to boycott stores that don’t mention Christmas, voice their protest in various social-media outlets, align themselves with various political talking-heads (some who may not even be Christians), and even make a movie about saving Christmas.

Is this really about living as faithful witnesses of Jesus or is it about preserving a culture that favors Christian sentiments? In other words, is this culture war over Christmas motivated by a desire to serve God or a selfish political desire?

To be frank, I really don’t care whether a person says “Merry Christmas” or “Happy Holidays.” What I’m concerned about is the notion that some Christians have which believes that this is a spiritual battle that they must stand up and fight. They seems to believe that Christians can and should go blow for blow with society. However, taking a page from Branch Rickey, when this is done, society only seems to think that Christians have lost their temper… and seem quite ready to leave us to ourselves where we can pout in the corner while we have a tantrum.

Isn’t there a better way? I certainly believe so!

Love, Service, and Hospitality

For the last few weeks I’ve been preaching through the book of 1 Peter. In one sentence, this is a letter that addresses how Christians must live as the holy people of God amidst a hostile culture. Never does Peter say anything about fight back, standing up for your rights, boycotting and protesting those who don’t show favor to Christian values. Instead Christians are persistently reminded to be the church. That is, instead of trying to determine how the rest of society should live, Christians should make every effort to embody the living hope they have received.

One of the more important passages in about Christians embodying the  living hope they have received is found in 1 Peter 4:7-11:

For the culmination of all things is near. So be self-controlled and sober-minded for the sake of prayer. Above all keep your love for one another fervent, because love covers a multitude of sinsShow hospitality to one another without complaining. Just as each one has received a gift, use it to serve one another as good stewards of the varied grace of God. Whoever speaks, let it be with God’s words. Whoever serves, do so with the strength that God supplies, so that in everything God will be glorified through Jesus Christ…

Loving one another, serving one another, being hospitable… Think about it! Branch Rickey told Jackie Robinson that they would win with hitting running, and fielding. Peter is telling us who call ourselves Christians that we win by loving one another, serving one another, being hospitable towards each other.

If we really believe in Jesus then we need to be Christians who have the courage to not fight back… or at least not fight back on society’s own low ground. Instead we must learn to fight with love, service, and hospitality. Then we become a living demonstration of the reason for the season, the life Jesus came into this world to offer through his own death and resurrection.

Communion With Jesus, Our Savior

Yesterday during our worship gathering with the Columbia Church of Christ, the following was story was read as we began sharing the bread and wine, the body and blood of Jesus, our Savior:

Though I have heard and given many of Lord’s Supper meditations, there is on that is firmly fixed in my mind: An elderly man in a church I was attending stood one Sunday to give his meditation. He slowly made his way to the pulpit and then slowly spoke these words…

“When I was a younger man I thought when I would be aged that I would be done with sin. Now as an old man I realize that sin is more powerful to me today than ever before. That is why I need this cup and this bread. That is why I need communion. That is why I need a Savior, and that is why I am thankful for what my Savior has done.”

It is with those simple words that the man sat down and together we worshiped in a time of true communion.

Then we sang the hymn There Is A Fountain. Here is a video of Selah singing this hymn with scenes from Jesus’ passion.

And that is why I love gathering with the church for worship and why I need to gather with the church in worship where we proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes (cf. 1 Cor 11:26). For I too am a sinner and need reminding of God’s grace, the story of Jesus, our Savior, which offers the promise that sin is not the final word.

So remember this throughout the week. There is another word after sin and it’s written in the blood of Jesus… Salvation!

When Preaching Fails

One of the books I’m reading for my upcoming class is a book that my teachers, David E. Fitch and Geoff Holsclaw, wrote titled Prodigal Christianity. One of the stories they tell in the book is about watching this street preacher stand for the truth (as he understand it) with boldness as he preaches, only to be rejected by the people he is preaching at. So the authors make this very good point:

“We acknowledge the need for grounding in truth, but when we are too quick to make bold pronouncements, we compromise our ability to witness because we have not truly entered into the cultural world to be with people: to listen to, seek God with, an learn from those with to whom we are witnessing” (p. 53).

Thanks to another preacher, John Dobbs, here’s a video of some other preacher that helps illustrate their point:

Similar to Fitch and Holsclaw, my friend Fred Liggen says that leadership requires listening, learning, and loving. He’s right. They’re right. Before were can lead others some place, which is what preaching seeks to do, we must listen to them, learn from them, and love them.